2-DAY ON COURSE WORKSHOP STRATEGIES

Here you’ll find innovative ways that educators across the curriculum have used or adapted the structures/strategies they learned in a 2-Day On Course Workshop at their campus.

PLEASE NOTE: Strategies for each workshop are intended for educators who have attended that workshop. The active learning structure is explained (and experienced) during the workshop, but that explanation is not included with the strategy in this section. Readers who have not yet attended an On Course workshop can access an archive of hundreds of Best Practices intended for use by all educators.

2-day Strategies

Learner-Centered Structures/Strategies/Groupings from the Two-Day Workshop:

  • Case Study (Purchased Paper)
  • Guided Conversation
  • Case Study (A Fish Story)
  • Quick List (Qualities of Successful Students)
  • Case Study (Popson’s Dilemma)
  • Popcorn Reading
  • Jigsaw
  • Paired Quiz
  • Hand Up/Stand Up
  • Gallery Walk
  • Self-Management Quadrants
  • Read Around
  • Think/Pair/Share/Square
  • Corners
  • How Can I Use/Adapt?
  • Quotation Game (Responsibility Quotes)
  • Giving Advice (Advising Allysa)
  • Fishbowl
  • Value Line (Popson’s Dilemma)
  • Think/Pair/Share/Square
  • Thirty-Five
  • Quiz/Quiz/Trade
  • PMI + Q (Plus, Minus, Interesting, Question)
  • Metaphor (Chair Lift)
  • Sentence Stems (If I take full responsibility….
  • Video (Zea)
  • Journal
  • Card Swap
  • Groupings
  • Whole-Group (Q&A)
  • Small-Group
  • Pair
  • Solo

Total Strategies = 258
Comment on these strategies by clicking the Forum Link at the bottom of each discipline. Forum Image Option

Accounting (4)

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students learn Assets, Liabilities, and Owner’s Equity. In Home Groups of three, students choose their topic and then use their text and class lectures to develop expertise. Expert Groups then discuss/learn their topic and create 10 test questions with answers. Experts return to their home groups and teach others their topic and test the knowledge. Collect the questions and use the best ones on the next test.

Fishbowl: Purpose – Students select 1 of 4 companies in a given industry. Have students review financial analyses of 4 companies in the same industry and select one company that they would choose to invest in. Then assign the corners 1-4 for the participants to discuss their selections using the “fish bowl” structure. Each corner prepares a summary of results of discussions and reads to the class.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – Students understand the managerial use of financial statements. Have the students obtain the financial statements of one company for the past three years. Then calculate the 20 financial ratios discussed in class. Also calculate trend analysis for those three years. They then pair and discuss the financial standing of the company. Then share the information with the rest of the class.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students learn to identify which accounts appear on each financial statement and explain the information provided on each statement. Each member of the group (groups of 3) will be assigned a financial statement. Expert groups will discuss the accounts which appear on each statement, how the statement is formatted, what information the statement provides and how it might be used in decision making. Experts return to their home group to discuss what they’ve learned. End with class discussion about what was learned.

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Back to Top of Accounting

Agriculture (2)

Value line: Purpose - Students develop their personal stance on the treatment of animals raised for meat. Following a brief lecture on animal rights vs. animal welfare, line students up 1-10 (1 = strongly agree with Animal Rights, 10 = strong agree with Animal Welfare). Ask students to discuss why they stood where they did in line with purpose of persuading others. Encourage students to move in line any time they are persuaded in either direction.

Case Study: Purpose - Students learn strategies related to farm transitioning and risk management. Present a case study where a farmer wants to bring in 2 sons to a farming operation that can really only support one. Students brainstorm and propose a solution that shows sound risk management principles. Each group shares its solution and the class discusses and finally votes on best strategy.

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Allied Health (4)

PMI+Q: Purpose - students explore possible careers within the Allied Health field. Give students a list of descriptions of Allied Health Professions. After reading, have students create a list of pluses, minuses, and what interests them about each profession. Have them develop questions that can be discussed or researched.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Dental assisting students identify what makes a good dental assistant. Have students write on an index card an answer to the questions "What is the most important trait or characteristic of a successful dental assistant? Why?" Then play Twenty-One to generate a Top 10 list of the most important traits or characteristics. Have students reflect on whether they possess these traits/characteristics.

Case Study: Purpose - Students learn about nutrition. Have students read a case study about a person trying to lose weight using a specific diet plan (e.g., Adkins or South Beach). Students then discuss the advantages/disadvantages of the diet (nutritionally) and decide whether the diet would be effective and healthy in the long term.

Value Line: Purpose - Students learn how to accurately document patient care. Use an EMS Patient Care Report (PCR) written by a past student (or actual call that has gone to court) and have the students critique it and issue a grade. Then students can discuss why they graded the way they did with a student that graded the opposite. Both sides can learn what works and what doesn't work on PCRs.

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Anatomy and Physiology (3)

PMI + Q: Purpose - Students are divided into groups of four students. A physiological process (for example, breathing) is assigned to each group. Each group develops a flowchart (including visuals) that shows neural and muscular actions that describe what happens during the physiological process. Charts are displayed in an online discussion forum, and each student posts a PMI+Q entry in response to each chart.

Corners: Purpose - To get students thinking about using different characteristics to identify white blood cells. Have students go to different corners based on what they think is the most important identifying characteristic: granules, nuclear shape, nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, cell size. Have representatives from each group explain why their characteristic is most helpful.

Jigsaw: Purpose - To understand cardiovascular function. As homework, assign students different topics within a chapter (eg, Under Cardiovascular System: Student 1) Heart Anatomy, Student 2) Cardiac Cycle & Heart Sounds, Student 3) Electrical Stimulation of the Heart, Student 4) Anatomy of Vessels). At start of lecture, pair w/ like #s (eg, 1-1, 2-2) for review. Return to groups to coach each other and repeat. Have students align timing of chamber, pressure, sounds, and electrical signals.

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Anthropology (0)

Any Course (18)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn to identify and review important concepts at the end of each textbook chapter. Ask students to list the five most important concepts from a chapter. Play Twenty-One to generate a study guide that will be used to create exam questions. Benefit to instructor: Students have written the study guide!

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students review key concepts before a quiz. Using home groups of 4, assign each member of the group one of 4 key concepts on an upcoming quiz. Expert groups gather to share their knowledge of the concept and create 5 test questions with the answers. Experts return to the home groups and teach others the key concepts and test their knowledge.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students better understand why the course is required with the goal of helping them to become more open to learning the subject. On the first day ask, "Why is this course required for your major? What is the relevance?" (The answers might be specific or applied to a broad application.) Students write answers on cards and play game. Read the top five answers and applaud writers, adding or emphasizing, when appropriate, the benefits and outcomes of learning the material.

Jigsaw: Purpose - On the first day of class, students become familiar with the course syllabus and begin to create a community of learners. Place students in Home Groups groups of four and distribute the course syllabus. Ask students to decide who will become the group’s expert on four elements of the syllabus such as 1) Assignments/Tests (including due dates), 2) Course Rules, 3) Determination of Grades, 4) Use of Blackboard System. Expert groups meet and discuss what their Home Group members need to know about their element of the syllabus and how they will convey it. Experts return to their home groups and teach their topic. Instructor then quizzes the entire class to assure they understand the key issues.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students set the classroom rules and expectations. Have students write on an index card an answer to the question, "What is one behavior that you want to see exhibited by your peers inside our classroom?" Then play Twenty-One to generate a Top 10 list of behaviors for a positive learning environment. Publish this list on a handout and, as homework, ask students to consider any changes they would like to see in the list. In the next class, finalize the list and post it in the classroom as well as on the class web site. Ask students to remind anyone (including the instructor) when s/he isn't following the agreed-upon rules and expectations.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students become experts on a chapter topic and teach it to their peers. In home groups, students choose a section of the chapter upon which to become an expert. Students study chosen chapter sections for homework. At the next class meeting, students form expert groups to discuss most important concepts/ideas to and how best to teach home group members. Finally, students return to home groups, and chapter section experts teach the rest of the group.

Quick List (Online): Purpose - Have students identify personal behaviors conducive to being successful in an online class. Ask students to post on the class discussion board a list of behaviors they think will most help them succeed in an online class. Have students discuss the behaviors they will implement this semester.

*Twenty-One & Who’s the Expert & Gallery Walk: Purpose - Review appropriate format for short answer/essay questions, as well as review content for exam. Ask "practice" exam questions with typical points associated with that question indicated. Ask students to write an appropriately formatted well-organized answer to the questions. Use " Twenty-One" to choose the "top five" responses. Post "top five" randomly with the addition of an answer written by the instructor. Then and ask students to guess which is the instructor formatted answer. Use sticky dots to vote. Repeat if desired on multiple days prior to exam.

Popcorn Reading & PMI+Q: Purpose - Involve students in an active review of the syllabus, alerting them of its importance, AND get them interacting on day one. Distribute the syllabus and popcorn read it aloud. Divide the students into groups of 3 according to month/day of birth (perhaps line up and then sort to groups). Have each group generate one Plus, one Minus, one Interesting point and one question they have from the syllabus. Put together four of these smaller groups to share their PMI+Q and have one scribe transfer their list to a white board. (Realize this is a large group but the point is to reduce redundancy of items and create only two or three master lists). Have everyone in the class individually rank the pluses and then share with one other person (to generate enthusiasm for the course.) Answer all questions that came up!

Quick List & Who's the Expert? & Gallery Walk: Purpose - Focus students on preparation for an upcoming exam. Place students in groups to create a quick list of the "five most important concepts" to understand from the current unit. Have each group post their list, as well as one created by the instructor (the expert). Do a gallery walk to have students vote for which list they think was created by the instructor. Follow up with discussion.

Jigsaw: Purpose - review for the final exam. Break students up into groups of four and have each student in the group choose one unit from the course. Then have each "unit" group gather to discuss the important ideas from that unit, create a study question set and outline the material. Students then return to home groups to share their study questions and outlines. Collect the study questions and use some as questions on the final exam.

Value Line: Purpose - Students consider the value of a course having a mandatory attendance policy. Have students respond to a question such as "Attendance should be mandatory in DS 099 class," by ranking a scale from 1 (Completely Disagree) to 10 (Completely Agree). Have students do a Value Line on this item. Pair up 1's, 2's, 3's, etc and have each pair come up with an argument for their position. After each pair presents, invite the other students to reposition themselves in the line. Have students journal afterward on whether they changed their minds or not, and why.

Who's the Expert? Purpose - Student explore "truths" about what make writing strong. Take quotations from authors who have written about what makes for strong writing (eg, Stephen King, Anne Lamott, Heather Sellers) and have students make up a quotation about a similar specific "truth" about writing. Conduct the Gallery Walk on Who's the Expert, eventually revealing the "real writer" and then remind the class that they are all "real writers"!

Value Line: Purpose - Support student getting over fear of speaking in class. Use 3 x 5 card to write down what scares you the most about speaking in public. Collect the cards and create a list of the top 10. The next day hand out the list and have students rate them. Form the Value Line. Talk to the person next to you, then go down the line for student input (so each student is "talking"). Fold the line and have a discussion with the person opposite you.

Self-Management Quadrants: Purpose - Students learn to analyze how they spend their time and prioritize their activities. 1) Have students keep a diary of all of their activities during a weekday that they spend on campus and the time spent doing each one. 2) Show them the self-management quadrants and have them place each of their activities and time in the appropriate box. 3) Have them explain their quadrants to instructor or a partner. 4) Make suggestions about where they may have misplaced an activity. 5) Students then write a reflection on what they’ve learned about the things they do, why they do them, and how they might modify their daily schedules.

Think/Pair/PMI+Q: Purpose – Develop a thesis statement for a research paper. After drafting thesis, students partner and offer each other at least one PMI+Q for the partner’s thesis statement.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Prepare for chapter test by creating questions in different formats. In Home groups, have students choose a question format: multiple choice, fill in the blank, True/False (etc.). Students then search the chapter for possible test questions using their chosen format. In Expert groups, students develop questions in their chosen format. Back in Home groups, students quiz group members and give correct answer. Finally, groups turn in questions to the teacher to be used on the next test

Twenty-One: Purpose – Students review important concepts from a previous class or chapter. Have students write on index cards their answers to the following question: What was the most important thing you learned in our previous class (or from reading the assigned homework chapter). Facilitate Twenty-One, choose and read the top five or so answers, and lead a discussion of the quality of these answers.

Forum Image Option2-Day Any Course Forum

Art (4)

Value line: Purpose - Students learn to evaluate works of art based on specific criteria. Students read criteria of expanded square problem and see four examples placed on board. Students rate designs 1 (best) through 4 (worst) based on successful solving of problem. Students line up according to where they placed one piece of work and defend their positions. Students use expanded square problem to create two original works of art.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – In an art history course, to help students make connections and achieve an understanding of how the arts and socio-political events are highly interrelated in terms of influence and impact. Give all students a list of names and dates of artworks (include images), musical composition, literary works and political socio-historic events (from within decade) and working along, students to add some of their own. Break students into pairs and have students note connections between items on list. For example, Surrealist artists who had read Freud’s "Interpretation of Dreams" were especially prolific after WWI. Have one student be the recorder. Afterwards, students share all of the connections with the whole class. Point out how we can help each other notice new connections.

Value Line: Purpose - Students improve understanding of drawing techniques and pose suggestions for ways in which drawings might be improved. Students analyze and grade (A to F) a drawing by an anonymous former student or from the public domain. Students line up by grade awarded. Lead a discussion of the strategies and techniques utilized in the drawing and encourage input on how the drawing could be improved. Compile a list of student suggestions that might be used in a rubric used to grade future assignments.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn to identify and differentiate among various avant-garde art movements in early 20thcentury Europe and understand how socio-historical circumstances influenced development of these different styles. In home groups, students choose a topic: 1) German Expressionism, 2) Cubism, 3) Futurism, 4) Dada and use textbook and edited collection of primary sources to develop expertise. Expert groups discuss/learn topic and create 10 test questions with answers. Experts teach topic to home groups and test knowledge. Collect questions and use best ones on next test.

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Biology (14)

Jigsaw: Purpose - Allow students to be more actively involved in learning "long lists" of course topics (e.g., contraceptive types or STD's). Put students into home groups. Each student chooses a subset of a provided list (e.g., chemical contraceptives or viral STD's) and researches the subset as homework. In class, provide time for "experts" to meet and share information on their part of the lists; then they return to their home groups to teach/share. Spend the rest of the time addressing with the whole class those questions that could not be answered in the home group or related issues (e.g., Why contraceptives fail or How to prevent/treat STD's.)

Value Line: Purpose - Human Reproduction/Sexuality. Engage in discussion of why young people do not use condoms as a preliminary to discussing condom distribution. Create a list of top ten reasons young people do not use condoms. Then do a value line with students explaining their reasoning.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Analysis of a scientific paper. Assign a scientific paper for homework reading. In class, form home groups of 4, and each student becomes an expert on one section (Intro/Methods/Results/Discussion) of the paper. Expert groups discuss teacher-provided questions regarding each section. Experts return to their home groups to explain to the others their section, using what they have learned from answering the questions. End with having the entire class discuss additional questions regarding the paper.

Quick-List: Purpose - Students create lists of risks/benefits for a treatment, such as hormone replacement therapy after menopause, or reasons why antibiotic resistance is becoming an increasing problem. In each case, first have students create their lists individually, then join as a pair, and finally reporting out to the whole large group.

Who's the Expert? (variation): Purpose - Students learn to identify reliable vs unreliable sources on scientific topics such as greenhouse effect or global warming. Provide examples of expert, advocate, and "windmill" statements: Expert simply expresses scientific facts; advocate crosses the line and supports a given opinion strenuously; "windmill" is a statement with no basis in fact. Post the statements and have students select the one(s) which are actual expert statements vs advocate or "windmill."

Value Line: Purpose - Students learn the issues of using stem cells. Have students rank statements on the value of using stem cells. These statements would include different types (embryonic, adult, and iPS) and/or different uses (paralysis, testing drugs, hair replacement, Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, etc.) Allow them to better understand the possibilities and origins of stem cells.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students practice answering free-response exam questions at an appropriate depth. Students are given five minutes to write their answer to a question (such as "Describe the process of feedback inhibition of an enzyme") on an index card. Play Twenty-One, and then use a document projector to look at the top three responses and discuss as a class what makes them good answers to the question. VARIATION: Make photocopies of actual student answers for a particular question on an exam (just the answer, without noting student names.) Bring these to class, and play Twenty-One with those answers, and similarly review the top three responses and discuss the qualities that made them high quality.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students research and take a stand on the issue of whether global warming is more a result of human activities or just nature at work. Provide students with an extensive bibliography of sources that discuss global warming. Each student chooses and reads for homework three sources from the list; then they write in 300 words or less their informed opinion of the cause of global warming, offering evidence that they found in their sources. Play Twenty-One and discuss the top five top-scoring answers.

Jigsaw: Purpose - In lab, students learn five ways to test common substances for Protein, Carbohydrates and Place students in Home Groups of five and a list of five test. Students each choose one test method and then study 1) the purpose of the test, 2) the basis of the test, 3) the procedure they must use, and 4) what constitutes a positive and negative result. Expert groups gather and first agree on the four items above; then they perform their test. Experts then return to their home groups and 1) explain the purpose of the test they did, 2) clarify the basis of the test, 3) describe the procedure they used, and 4) show a sample of both a negative and positive result.

Quotation Game: Purpose - To clarify the concept of scientific theory. Students form 6 groups and are given 10 quotes from science journals stating the scope of scientific theory. Each group synthesizes the essence of these idea into a concise statement describing scientific theory. Students write their ideas (sentence) on large sheets. Tape to wall. Students vote for the one they believe is the most complete and clear, using colored dots. Discuss.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Exam preparation/topic review. Provide a potential essay question that might appear on an upcoming exam. Examples: Describe the flow of electrons during photosynthesis; describe how blood is filtered by the nephrons of the kidneys. Have students write answers and then play Twenty-One. Identify the top scoring answers and discuss why.

Gallery Walk: Purpose - Help students understand the major points of a lab. At the conclusion of a particularly challenging lab, have each lab group list their conclusions/summaries and observations. Post lists and have students vote for the two lists that cover the main points of the lab in the most clear and concise manner. The instructor can address any major points that were not covered by the student comments.

Value Line: Purpose – Students discover the wide variety of perspectives on Evolution. Have students read 10 varying perspectives on Evolution – from purely scientific to a strongly religious view on the other end. Students line up based on their comfort and general understanding of evolution. The line can be "Folded" to encourage discussion. Faculty can put scientifically supported evidence of evolution on overhead to springboard into traditional discussion on evolution and natural selection.

Value Line: Purpose – In a Human Reproduction/Sexuality course, engage in discussion of why young people do not use condoms as a preliminary to discussing condom distribution. Create a list of top ten reasons young people do not use condoms. Then do value lines with students for their various reasons.

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Botany (1)

Jigsaw: Purpose - In lab, help students learn to recognize basic cell and tissue types, following a general introduction. Create six stations with a single microscope, some slides of roots, leaves and stems, and some figures of specific cell types, one type per station (e.g., vessels, traceids, phloem, parenchyma, epidermis.) Students at each station learn to identify their cell/tissue type in X-S and L-S sections of various specimens. At home groups, each group looks at a new unfamiliar slide and creates a labeled figure of all the cells and tissues in it, and makes a labeled sketch of what they think their specimen would look like in a different view. (i.e., if the slide was X-S, what would the specimen look like in L-S, or vice versa?).

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Business (5)

Value Line: Purpose - Students analyze, evaluate, and improve resume writing skills. Have students evaluate an adequate (not exceptional) resume on a scale from 1 to 10 (1 being weak, 10 being strong). Then ask students to line up in a value line and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the resume.

Who’s the Expert?/Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students explore the differences between leaders and managers. In groups, have students read various expert quotes regarding leadership vs. management. Then have students write their own statement regarding the difference between leaders and managers on a flipchart page. Post the statements, including one real expert statement. All students then vote on which statement was written by the expert. Discuss why students voted on the top three statement(s).

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn how to write a job objective for their resumes. Have students write on an index card - a job objective based on the information from a lecturette on developing job objectives from the company's perspective. Then play Twenty-One. Generate a list of the top 5 objectives, and publish on the class website.

PMI+Q Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students write a company overview for a business plan. Have students write their company overview, using PMI+Q to help strengthen the overview. Pair with another student. One read their company overview and the other discusses the plus of the overview, minuses of the overview, and then asks a question. Reverse roles. Then share with the class all the pluses discussed in pairs.

Value Line: Purpose – Students understand role of employer and employee and how this relationship can vary. Explain to class that some employers can/do read their employees’ company email to monitor their actions. Have students line up from 1-7, with one believing the practice is totally unacceptable and #7 believing the practice is totally acceptable. Lead discussion on arguments that support both sides of the issue. I.e. company owns email server and may be legally responsible for your actions.

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Career Exploration (1)

Value Line: Purpose – Have students examine and identify good criteria for a resumé. Project a resumé written by a previous student on the projector screen. Have students read the resumé and individually grade it. Have students then line up by the grade they gave the resumé. Discussion follows (led by instructor) of what the strengths and weaknesses are in the resumé. The resumé rubric is used to determine criteria met and not met.

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Chemistry (5)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students better understand why the course is required with the goal of helping them to become more open to learning the subject. On the first day ask, "Why is chemistry a required course for your major? What is the relevance?" (The answers might be specific or applied to a broad application.) Students write answers on cards and play game. Read the top five answers and applaud writers, adding or emphasizing, when appropriate, the benefits and outcomes of learning the material.

Value Line: Purpose - Students examine theories of global warming. Have students read and rate (1-8) their agreement with one of the theories proposed by scientists for present-day global warming. Line up students by their rating. Then bend the line so that 1 pairs with 8 and have the pair discuss their views on the theory.

Jigsaw: Purpose - students learn about factors that affect the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reactions (temperature, pH, substrate concentration, enzyme concentration). In the lab, students collect enzyme rate data under different conditions. Each member of the lab group is assigned to an expert group in one of the four areas (temp, pH, [S], [E]) and works with the expert group to collect and interpret lab data. Each student then returns to their "home" lab group and shares the results from their expert group work. Each "home" lab group then writes a summary of the factors affecting enzyme rate and answers a set of questions on a report. As a result, more time can be spent analyzing and interpreting data instead of collecting data by having each group conduct all four assays.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students gain mastery in naming chemical compounds. Home groups of four become experts on the guidelines, scope and specific examples of how to name binary ionic, polyatomic ionic, transitional ionic and covalent compounds. Experts meet together and then return to home group to teach their topic. At the end home groups compete to correctly name a list of 10 chemical compounds on a written list as a competition (and assessment!)

Case Study/Gallery Walk: Purpose – In forensic chemistry, students learn to develop alternative hypotheses using the same set of information. Students are given a set of evidence and a case scenario. Students reach one decision regarding the evidence and then are shown an opposing expert decision. On a flipchart page, students in small groups develop a set of questions by which the opposing expert’s opinion can be challenged. After posting pages on wall, have students vote for the most effective questions and discuss.

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Child Development (1)

Value line: Purpose - Students improve understanding of the influence of heredity and environment on human development. Students rate the influence of heredity (1) and environment (10) on human development. Students line up in order and explain their positions, with those on the extreme ends of the line stating their positions before those in the middle.

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Computers (9)

Jigsaw: Purpose – In an intro to programming course, students to learn the use of: substring () method, index of () method, TextBox control, Button control. In home groups of four students pick one of the items, and then research via notes, web, and textbook. Get with expert group to solidify knowledge and create three examples of usage. Return to home group and teach others their concept, share examples. Post examples on class web page.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students in a Microsoft Applications class learn practical uses for a database application (Access), thus increasing their intrinsic motivation to learn the program. Students usually see the value of learning Word and Excel, but often fail to see the value of learning Access. After explaining generally what Access can do, ask students, "What is one use for a database application like Access in the business world?" Then play Twenty-One (or Twenty-One if you prefer only three rounds). Lead a discussion of the top five ideas. Publish the list on a handout or class web site. Consider replying the game with the following question: "What is one use for a database application like Access in your personal life?"

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students consider the computer hardware solutions & technology support needs of a real estate office environment and recommend a solution to meet their needs. Have students individually develop a list of needs for the client and recommend specific computer hardware components such as laptops, desktop computers, monitors, printers and networking strategy. Students then pair and compare their recommendations, using the best ideas from each partner. Finally, pairs share their combined solution with the class.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn real- life applications of database programs such as Microsoft Access. In Home Groups of five students, each chooses to become the group's expert on how data bases are used in a 1) local business, 2) large church, 3) hospital 4) local unemployment office, and 5) bank. Students interview people in each location, asking what database program is used and how this program is employed to maintain their records. Students share findings with their home groups.

Twenty-One: Purpose - To evaluate computer ethics. Have students answer the following question on a 3x5 card: How would you define Computer Ethics to a fundamental computer course student? Then play Twenty-One and read the top 3 to 5 definitions. Share, discuss, and compare class definitions to a sourced definition.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn how to logically assign IP address to a computer network by subnetting a single IP address. Students will be assigned a network and a single IP address that they will subnet for the correct number of network and host address (homework). They will pair up at the next meeting to present their work to the class.

Quick List and Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Identify threats to information security. Have students list as many threats as they can think of (based on chapters in course and discussion); then pair students to compare lists. Finally, compile a complete list of all threats identified and share with the entire class.

Value Line: Purpose - students learn the various operating systems. Have students read a scenario where a business is trying to decide which operating system to use. Have the students rank the various operating systems from best to worse. Then have the students get into a value line and discuss why they selected that particular operating system. Compile a list of various attributes of each operating system.

PMI-Q: Purpose - Students explore the design process with constructive criticism.
1. Ask students to design an android app that will help solve a problem in their community.
2. Have each student present the design to a peer and have that peer share two plusses they see in the program.
3. Have them switch seats and then present the program to another person who will give them two minuses regarding the program.
4. Switch seats again and present to a third person who will identify two interesting parts of the project.
5. Repeat and get two questions from the final person in the exchange.
Students take all the feedback and revise their app for final submission by the next class period.

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Cosmetology (1)

Case Study: Purpose - To learn the Laws of Color when applied to correcting undesired results. Have students read a case study in which a client comes in with an unwanted color result from a home hair coloring. Students discuss ways of consulting with the client as to what was done (colors used and application), the desired color, and the steps they would take to fix the undesired result. Follow-up with presentation and reading on color results and corrections to verify or correct student choices.

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Construction Technology (1)

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to lay out a wall. Provide students with a set of plans. First working alone, they determine the best way to lay out a wall for framing. Then, pair students and have them discuss the best combination of their two approaches to laying out a wall. Finally, have each pair present/demonstrate to the class how to lay out a wall.

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Culinary Arts (1)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students develop their imagination and sense of creativity in cooking. Provide students in a Baking and Pastry Arts class with a list of food products. Using knowledge about baking techniques and procedures covered in class, each student creates a recipe to design a new/unique dessert that will include a base item, sauce, garnish and decoration. Students play Twenty-One (or maybe just 28) to come up with the top recipes.

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Dance (1)

Read Around & Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to recognize the qualities and effort it takes to achieve success in the field of dance (perhaps overcoming an obstacle). Students read around an excerpt from a biography or an article about a well known professional in the field of dance. Solo – identify the qualities, choices, etc. that led to their success. Share in pairs, then with whole group.

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Diesel Technology (1)

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – To develop problem solving/critical thinking skills. Give the students a challenge problem such as “poor fuel economy.” Students then work alone to come up with possible causes of the problem. Next pair students and have them determine the most likely cause of those they have identified. Finally, have them identify a possible solution to the problem and share it with the class.
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Earth Science (2)

Think/Pair/Square/Share: Purpose – Students learn to identify the tectonic environments that typically create different rock types. After students have completed a lab exercise on tectonic environments associated with rock types, students are given a rock sample. Individually they identify the rock and describe where and how it formed, including evidence for the typical tectonic environment. Students then share and refine their answers in pairs, then explain their results to the squares. Final results are shared with the class.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn observational/critical thinking/discussions about minerals/rock types. Have students work alone with a sample of rock (any type) or mineral and provide them with 5 minutes to describe all they can about it. Pair students to compose notes and then explain to class their observations.

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Economics (1)

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn about factors that affect changes in equilibrium market prices. In groups of six, students choose from a list of factors: income, prices of related goods, technology, inputs, etc. Using the text, notes, and/or reading logs, students study their factor. Students pair with other students who are expert on the same factor to further develop expertise. Students return to home groups and explain how a change in one factor affects equilibrium market price.

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Education (6)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students in a Measurement & Evaluation course learn to write effective multiple choice test questions. After studying how to write effective multiple choice test questions, each student writes one MC question on an index card. The question can be for any subject or grade level of their choosing. Play Twenty-One to identify the "Top 10 Multiple Choice Test Questions" and publish these as exemplars. Use any poorly written test questions to review the guidelines of writing effective multiple choice questions. Ask students which guidelines were violated and ways to improve those items.

Hand Up/Stand Up, Think/Pair/Share & PMI+Q: Purpose - Students practice writing and critiquing lesson plans. Have students create a lesson plan to teach addition of fractions using a discovery approach. Using hand up/stand up, have students pair up and provide feedback on their partner's lesson plan, discussing the Pluses and Minuses of the plan, as well as what they find Interesting about the plan. Finally, they offer Questions they still have about the plan. Bring the class together for a discussion of what they learned from the activity about writing lesson plans.

Value Line: Purpose - Students examine pros and cons of teaching mathematics with an inquiry-based approach. Present a statement about inquiry-based teaching in mathematics. Have students rate their agreement (1-9) and then find their place on the value line. Students then share their positions for, against and in the middle. Assign students homework to read articles for and against teaching mathematics with an inquiry-based approach. Repeat the value line and have students discuss whether they maintained their ranking or changed and why?

Value Line: Purpose - Students evaluate lesson plans for learner-centered activities. After participating in learner-centered activities as part of the class, students look at a lesson plan for social studies. Students then rank a list of classroom activities by deciding how much that activity would contribute to creating a learner-centered lesson. Students do a value line on several of the activities in the list, discussing the merits of the selected activities. Debrief to draw out the idea that there are multiple ways to create learner-centered lessons.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Teach education students the parts of the lesson cycle plan. Divide students into groups of 4 and let students select a part of the lesson cycle (objective, modeling guided practice, independent practice and assessment). Use handout and text pages for information to develop expertise in lesson planning. Return to Home group and create a lesson plan on flip chart pages. Present the lesson plans to the entire class with feedback on the lesson cycle described.

PMIQ: Purpose - In Early Childhood Education, students analyze their own birth order. Students do a PMIQ regarding their own birth order. In particular, they look for how their birth order may be impacting their life today. They end by researching and writing a report on three or more of the questions they have about their own birth order.

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Electromechanical Technology (1)

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – Students learn to solve problems. Give students a problem with a piece of equipment, have each student write down what they think will fix the problem. Then pair them up so they can discuss between them which solution is most reasonable and present solution to class with their reasons for why their solution is the best.

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Electronics (1)

Handup/Standup: Purpose – Learning to solve complex circuits in an AC/DC class. Have students do Handup/standup to pair with another student, and have each student share with the other a method for solving this particular circuit. After this, do a repeated Handup/Standup, find another partner, and repeat, so students can see possible multiple ways to solve that circuit problem.

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Emergency Medical Service (EMS) (1)

Popcorn Reading & Case Study: Purpose - Students learn to do a proper history and evaluation when responding to an emergency call. Using Popcorn Reading, have students read a case study that elaborates on the following situation: Upon arriving at the home, the EMS team is told by the mother that she was playing with her one-month-old female child in the crib when the child stopped breathing. The mother shouted for her husband, who ran into the room, grabbed the child, and blew in her face. The mother reports, "She turned a blue color and didn't breathe until my husband blew in her face." For about 20 minutes, the infant remained limp and quiet. Presently, the father is holding the infant who is now awake and making noises. Ask students, "What should the EMS team do now?" Make a list of answers on the board. Transition to lecture to affirm correct choices, explain inappropriate choices, add choices not listed, and prioritize the actions.

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Engineering (2)

PMI+Q: Purpose - help students understand the impact of robotics-manufacturing in the workforce. After a discussion of robotics and their applications in the manufacturing in the workforce, ask students for the positives, negatives, interest points, and questions. Use the students’ responses to set a framework of the factory dynamics and the balance of humans and machines.

Case Study: Purpose - Students learn how small changes to design can have legal consequences. Write a case study in which an engineer is tasked with saving $75K for a manufacturing company that builds chairs. The engineer saves $77K by using a different design for the screws that hold up the main body of the chair. Six months after the chairs are manufactured; a lawsuit is filed against the manufacturer because of an accident caused by a broken screw. Popcorn read the case study and discuss the implications of the design changes.

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English - Reading (2)

Popcorn & Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn to identify the author's purpose in a reading selection. Students popcorn read aloud an article/essay from the textbook (this assures that everyone has read the article). Each person then writes on an index card their answer to the following: "What is the author's purpose for writing this article/essay?" Play Twenty-One to generate the top five answers. Discuss the similarities and differences among the answers. Conclude with a discussion of how one determines the purpose of a piece of writing.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students practice and become skilled at summarizing articles. For homework, have students read an article from the course textbook (or other source) and write a summary of the article on a 4"x6" index card. Tell students that during their next class, they will be using their summaries in a game and that they won't be able to play if they don't have a summary. For extrinsic motivation, you might announce that there will be prizes for the top five scores. In the next class, have students play Twenty-One, determining the best five summaries. Afterwards, have students identify the criteria by which they assessed the summaries, making a list of these qualities for posting in the classroom and/or class website.

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English - Writing (13)

Value Line & Think/Pair/Share & Use/Adapt: Purpose - Students learn to find and employ evidence in writing a persuasion essay. Assign students to research and then take a stand on a controversial statement (e.g., It is appropriate to use animals for medical research). Assign several articles for homework on the topic, assuring that the articles include differing views and plenty of evidence. Students come to the next class with their thesis and a list of convincing evidence from the articles. Have students line up according to their agreement with the controversial statement (1-10). Fold the line and have students pair up to present their evidence and listen to the evidence of their partner. Afterwards, hold a class discussion about the importance of evidence in creating a persuasive argument and the best methods for presenting it in a persuasive essay. Conclude by having students write how they will use/adapt what they learned as they write their persuasion essay.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students identify and implement one new strategy to improve their writing. After returning a graded essay: (1) have students write on an index card something different they could do in order to improve their next essay (e.g., go to the tutoring center, rewrite the essay they just got back, etc.), (2) mix cards and have students play Twenty-One, (3) identify the ideas that got the top five scores, and (4) each student chooses one thing s/he will do different in order to improve his/her next essay.

Value Line: Purpose - Students become aware of and evaluate their assumptions about Standard English grammar. Provide students with assumptions about language such as 1) People who use bad grammar are lazy, 2) Some languages are more primitive than others, and 3) You can judge a person’s intelligence by their grammar. Ask students to volunteer any other assumptions they have heard and add to the list. Have students rate one assumption at a time from 1 (strongly disagree) to 10 (strongly agree), form a value line, and discuss each assumption, leading students to understand the view of linguists about assumptions.

Jigsaw & Use/Adapt: Purpose - Students learn to implement all four components of the writing process. In Step A, place students in groups of four and ask them to each select one of the four elements of the writing process: Pre-writing, Writing, Revising, and Editing. Discuss resources (e.g., textbook, tutoring center, class notes, etc.) for becoming their group’s expert on their chosen step of the writing process; then give them a specified amount of time to gather information. In Step B, have experts for each component of the writing process meet and decide how to teach the component to their home groups. In Step C, experts return to their home group and teach others their component of the writing process. Finally, have students write a paragraph about how they will use or adapt something they have learned about the steps in the writing process.

Value Line: Purpose - Students improve their writing skills. Have students read and grade (A to F) an essay written by an anonymous former student. (You can choose the essay to highlight writing issues of your choosing.) Have students line up by the grade they awarded the essay. Lead a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the essay and elicit suggestions about how the author could improve it. Finally, compile a list of student-generated suggestions for future reference, and possibly a rubric. [This same activity could be done with any element of writing, such as thesis statements, transitions, paragraph development, and conclusions.]

Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students learn to structure an essay by answering key questions about their thesis. Assign students to bring to class a thesis statement for their next essay. Each student write the thesis on a flip chart page, or if you have enough board space in the room, students can write it on the board. Students now walk around, read thesis statements, and write a question that the thesis causes them to wonder about. Students now collect their own flip chart page with thesis and questions. They choose the 3-4 questions that they think are most important, place them in the most logical order to answer, and use these questions as the focus of separate paragraphs that develop the thesis statement.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn how to identify and create strong thesis statements in their papers. Write criteria for strong thesis on the board or overhead, and provide some examples. Have students identify their own thesis statement in a draft essay. Then ask students to write the thesis statement on an index card. Play Twenty-One to generate the top five thesis statements. Discuss how each of these top five exemplify the criteria presented earlier.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Have students bring a paragraph draft for an upcoming essay to class. Have them rewrite this paragraph on an index card (hopefully revising it as they do) and then conduct the "Twenty-One" exchange. Specifically frame their reading by asking students to focus on things like grammar, structure, or content.

Who's the Expert? Purpose - Student explore "truths" about what make writing strong. Take quotations from authors who have written about what makes for strong writing (eg, Stephen King, Anne Lamott, Heather Sellers) and have students make up a quotation about a similar specific "truth" about writing. Conduct the Gallery Walk on Who's the Expert, eventually revealing the "real writer" and then remind the class that they are all "real writers"!

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students identify the qualities of a strong essay. After the first week of class, have students write a response to the question: What makes a good essay? Conduct the Twenty-One Game and debrief, asking students to identify their own strengths and weaknesses at this point in the semester and to make a plan for areas to emphasize in the remainder of the course.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn to critique, evaluate, and revise thesis statements and/or topic sentences. Instructor provides a topic and leads a discussion about possible ways to approach the topic. Students write thesis statements based on the topic/discussion. Play Twenty-One to generate a list of the top 5-10 thesis statements. Lead a class discussion about why each statement is a strong thesis and also about strategies that could be used to revise, improve, and strengthen each statement.

Who’s the Expert?: Purpose - To teach thesis basics. Students form 7 groups. Each group is given a handout which contains descriptions of good thesis statements from handbooks (written by experts). Students identify (first individually, then as a group) the key concepts that seem consistent – the seminal attributes of a good thesis statement. Each group drafts a statement outlining the attributes of a good thesis statement. 8 statements (the 7 plus one from another handbook) are posted. Students vote for the one they believe to have been written by an expert (by applying stickers). Discussion follows.

Value Line and Fish Bowl: Purpose – Students show support and defend a side of a controversial topic. Have students read an essay written by an anonymous former student about a controversial topic in which the student took a stance or action. Students will rate the writer’s conclusions (stance or actions) on a scale of 1 to 8 (1 being they disagree to 8 being they agree with the writer) and line up in a value line. Next, create a Fishbowl. Seat the students on each end of the Value Line (the 1 and the 8) in the center, along with an empty chair. Allow students to further develop their discussion on the writer’s conclusions.

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English - Literature (3)

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to explore character's motivations and actions. THINK: Have each student read/review the assigned reading assignment through the eyes of one of the characters. PAIR: Working with another student, create a summary of the events through the point of view/perspective of their assigned character. SHARE: Send a tweet (or email/text message) to others in the class summarizing the events, as if written by their character. In class, continue the discussion, sharing responses/reactions to the various points of view expressed by the characters in the story. Discuss how social media might have affected the outcome of the story had it been available to the characters (e.g., Juliet might have texted Romeo to let him know she’d be faking her death).

Twenty-One: Purpose – Students expand their understanding of a character. "Some literary scholars refer to Iago (Othello) as literature’s first psychopath. Defend or refute this claim." The option to defend or refute should not only force students to make a choice in answering, but to also examine competing ideas head-to-head and compare consensus ideas head-to-head in the scoring portion of the exercise.

Fish Bowl (with one minute paper): Purpose – Use Campbell's Hero's Journey to analyze the role of various characters in Jitterbug Perfume. Students write a one-minute paper responding to the questions "Who is the true hero/heroine of Jitterbug Perfume?" Choosing from a list of 4 possible options. Students then get into groups according to who they argued for. Volunteers then act as the "fish" are chosen from each group to take the place of previous "fish" to facilitate debate and encourage critical, evidence-based reasoning.

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ESL (1)

Quiz/Quiz/Trade: Purpose - Students learn parts of speech. Students each have a card with a different part of speech written on it. They find a partner. Then one of them describes what part of speech the other has and uses the part of speech in a simple sentence. Next, the other one describes the part of speech and uses it in a simple sentence. Finally, they trade cards and find new partners. This is a good activity to help students review parts of speech prior to a mid-term or final exam.

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Environmental Science (4)

Jigsaw: Purpose - Have students learn to explain the biogeochemical cycles. In the home groups, have each person be assigned one type of cycle: nitrogen cycle, carbon cycle, etc. Gather in expert groups based on type of cycle to clarify explanations. Reconvene in the home groups and have each student teach others the basics of his/her particular cycle. Follow up with an assessment to make sure all students have a clear understanding of each cycle.

Value Line (modified): Purpose - To understand the human impact on the environment. During the first class period, have the students rank from most important to least important from a list of six to eight of the significant environmental issues of the day. They are allowed to add one or two items that are not on the list already. Then create a value line on one of the items and ask students to explain their reasoning on the choice of importance. Repeat as possible. This exercise could then be used to shape the topic structure of the course.

Who's the Expert?: Purpose - Have students understand the meaning of the word "sustainability." During the first class meeting, put the students in small groups and have each group answer the question, "What is sustainability?" Post the group answers as well as the instructor-created definition, and have students attempt to identify the instructor's definition. This will help students become aware of the many aspects involved with sustainability, and also provide the instructor with an instant assessment of current level of understanding in the class as a whole.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - To teach students to promote recycling. After discussing the concepts of recycling, challenge students to think about innovative ways to expand recycling. Have students pair and discuss each other’s ideas. Have the students share their ideas with other students (in class, at student council meetings, with faculty members, and/or the community).

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Fine Arts (Painting, Ceramics, Photography) (2)

PMI+Q: Purpose - Students learn to accept and apply constructive feedback as well as to critique works of art. Students complete their visual/creative assignment and share it with the class asking for specific feedback using the PMI+Q model. In this way, the student is asking for feedback, something that is often difficult for students in the Fine Arts area. The student is also guaranteed to receive some Positive feedback, as well as some Minus comments that can help them stretch and grow. Having to think about "What is interesting about this piece of work?", and "What questions do I have for the artist?" are great ways to help students learn how to critique works of art and think more deeply about what they see.

Value Line: Purpose - Students improve understanding of drawing techniques and pose suggestions for ways in which drawings might be improved. Students analyze and grade (A to F) a drawing by an anonymous former student or from the public domain. Students line up by grade awarded. Lead a discussion of the strategies and techniques utilized in the drawing and encourage input on how the drawing could be improved. Compile a list of student suggestions that might be used in a rubric used to grade future assignments.

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Fire Law (1)

JIGSAW: Purpose – Student’s learn x,y,z "Acts/Rules" as they pertain to on the job responsibilities and experiences relating to pay, discrimination, negligence, etc. The "Acts/Rules" will be given to home groups. Students can use texts, notes, internet, etc. to develop their expertise. Expert groups will discuss/learn and create 5 questions. Experts will return and teach their topic. Use the best questions on a test. Any law class is a difficult class to keep students engaged. I like this active approach.

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Foreign Language (4)

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn Spanish verb conjugation in present tense. In home groups of three, students choose one of three topics: (a) regular _ar verb conjugation; (b) regular _er, _ir verb conjugation; or (c) irregular stem-changing verb conjugation. Expert groups study their topic and return to home groups to share the patterns of conjugation.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn useful Spanish phrases. Ask students if they were traveling to a Spanish-speaking country, what phrases would be useful to them. Have students individually create two useful phrases in Spanish. Pair students to teach each other their two phrases. Then share phrases with class.

Gallery Walk: Purpose - To teach reflexive and non-reflexive verbs when used with details. Divide students into groups of 4 students. Give each group a flipchart page and a photograph. Groups create a sentence describing their picture. After the first sentence is written, each group edits, adds to, or combines information to make more complex and descriptive sentences. Students then paste/tape picture on flipchart page and write sentence. Then post on wall and conduct gallery walk.

Quick List and Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students review vocabulary. Give students a category (colors, family members, foods). Within an allotted time liming, each student writes all the vocabulary words or phrases s/he can think of that fit that category. Students then pair up and compare lists adding those from the other student’s list. Then students share their lists with the whole class, adding any new words or phrased they didn’t get in the Think/Pair activity.

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Geography (2)

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Learn about Roots and Diversity. SOLO: Have students define and differentiate the concept of race vs. the concept of ethnicity, including the use of supporting arguments. PAIR: Have students compare and contrast these definitions with their partner’s and then come up with a consensus definition. SHARE: Have students present their resulting definitions to the rest of the class.

PMI-Q: Purpose - To help students think critically and creatively about Alternative Energy. Show a short video about the different kinds of alternative energy. Have each group pick 1 form of alternative energy and write; 2 pluses, 2 minuses, 2 things interesting, and 2 questions. Then have each of the groups present and explore answers from entire class.

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Health Occupations (4)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn to identify causes and symptoms of diseases/disorders. Ask students to write a description of an assigned disease or disorder, along with its causes, signs, symptoms, and treatments on an index card. Play Twenty-One and discuss the top five top-scoring answers.

Who’s the Expert?: Purpose - Students collaboratively create an expert poster on what is cardiovascular disease and what causes it. They should also list the effects of cardiovascular disease. Each group creates and hands in a poster. The instructor adds a poster to the mix; students do a gallery walk to analyze the information on the posters and vote on the one they think was created by the instructor. Discuss the clarity and comprehensiveness of top scoring posters.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – Students learn to develop and implement a treatment plan. Have students work alone to develop a treatment plan for a specific patient described in a case study (10 minutes). Pair students to compare and combine their treatment plans (10 minutes). Finally, have pairs present their treatment plan to the class, demonstrating at least two of the treatment interventions (students may use partner to demonstrate with needed equipment). Allow three minutes per demonstration.

Gallery Walk: Purpose – Students learn to critique the quality of ultrasound images. Post 8-10 ultrasound images on the wall. The images should range in quality and technique from Excellent to Poor. Have the students critique each image and write their comments on post-it notes to be placed under the image. Students will then review all the comments and decide on a final rating for each ultrasound as a group.

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History (3)

Twenty-One: Purpose - To help students see the connection between historic events. Pose a question such as : "How did the fall of Constantinople in 1453 affect western Europe?" and ask students to write on an index card an explanation of the cause/effect relationship between the two events. Then play 35 to identify the most complete and accurate responses. This engages all learners in thinking about cause/effect relationships in a historical context.

Case Study: Purpose - Students deal with historical choice. Have students read a case study about a loyalist during the Revolutionary War. Ask students to discuss how they would deal with the loyalist from the perspective of various roles: neighbor, employee, rebel, royally appointed governor, etc. Ask students to explain why their responses to the loyalist might change depending on their role.

Think/Pair/PMI+Q: Purpose – Develop a thesis statement for a research paper. After drafting thesis, students partner and offer each other at least one PMI+Q for the partner’s thesis statement.

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Hospitality Management (1)

Case Study & Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to handle difficult customers. Present a brief case study in which a hotel employee is confronted by a difficult customer. For example, a customer at the registration desk is upset because his room is not ready when he arrives one hour before check in time and refuses to stop cussing loudly, upsetting and delaying other guests who are waiting in line to check out. First, have students write what they would do if they were the hotel employee being yelled at. Next, have students pair to compare their answers. Finally, bring the class back together and have students explain what their partner said s/he would do. Guide the conversation to emphasize effective ways for the hotel employee to demonstrate emotional intelligence under fire.

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Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)

Hand-Up/Stand-Up: Purpose - In Anatomy lab, help students learn new terminology. Assign one new term to each student. Instruct students to spend 10-15 minutes finding that item on a model, on a chart, and on an x-ray or other material to be used on exam. Next, have students use Hand-Up/Stand-Up to find a partner and spend two minutes teaching each other their items. Have students find a new partner and exchange their information again. Repeat until each student has met with every other student and covered all the terms.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students discover how to learn from different sources in the anatomy lab. Have students sit in groups of 4. All students in each group learn the same material but use different instructional formats: model, chart, x-ray, and cadaver. Have experts from different home groups meet and then have students return to Home Groups to share what they have discovered about learning in their particular format.

Case Study & Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Have students read clinical case studies (which appear at the end of the selected textbook for this course) and learn the details of each case. After reading, each student explains his/her understanding to a lab partner for feedback, and the lab partner, with different life experiences, does the same. The pair of students critiques each other and then one pair delivers a presentation to the whole lab section of 10 to 24 students, who evaluate the quality of the students' oral presentation. (This activity should motivate each student to do well and improve student success on the clinical case studies already assigned.) Student pairs do this once each week during the semester.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Function and regulation of various parts of the nephron in urine formation. In home groups of four, students are assigned one of the four main parts of the nephron (glomerulus, PCT, loop, DCT). Expert groups discuss/learn about the role of their structure in urine formation and what regulates the various events at that structure. Experts return to their home groups and teach others their topic and test the knowledge.

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Human Environmental Biology (1)

PMI-Q: Purpose - Evaluate the use of nuclear radiation in generation of electricity. Have students generate a list of pluses, minuses, interesting features and questions about the use of nuclear power.

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Journalism (1)

Value Line: Purpose -- To show student reporters why it is so important to write an unbiased news story and to provide their readers with both sides of an issue. Present the class with a controversial topic such as a politician’s position on a hot issue. Ask students to rate their agreement with the politician’s position on a scale of 1-10 (1 totally agree…10 totally disagree). Pair students up as follows (1 & 6; 2 & 7; 3 & 8; 4 & 9; 5 & 10) and have them defend their ratings. Have the pairs explain to the class what they learned about the other side of the debate and how that story should be written.

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Leadership (2)

Quick List, Think/Pair/Share & Value Line: Purpose - Students understand the qualities/characteristics of an effective leader. Utilize the Quick List to have individual students come up with qualities of an effective leader. Next pair students and have them combine and expand their lists. In the large group, first create a list of all qualities; then narrow the qualities down to eight by discussion and voting. Now use the Value Line to promote discussion of which of the eight quality students believe are most important for a good leader to demonstrate.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn the important characteristics of a student leader. Each student writes on an index card his/her top trait of a student leader, with a supporting explanation. Then play Twenty-One to generate a list of the most important characteristics of a student leader.

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Mathematics (17)

Who’s the Expert: Purpose - Students improve understanding of functions and their purpose. Give students the job of writing an application for a linear function. Students form groups and each group writes a word problem on a flip chart page. Students vote for the problem that looks most like an exercise from the text. Homework that night is to solve the problems that can be solved.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students learn the similarities and differences between four different types of hypothesis tests. Four people per home group: 1. one population hypothesis is tested on proportion. 2. One population hypothesis is tested on mean. 3. Two population hypothesis is tested on proportions. 4. Two population hypothesis is tested on means. Expert groups convene and then return home to teach and to test home group. Collect problems experts created and use these or similar questions on test.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn how to choose the most efficient method to solve quadratic equations. Provide students with a set of quadratic equations to solve and a complete list of the different methods that may be used. For homework, have students independently develop a graphic organizer to describe when a particular method should be used based on characteristics of the equation. Pair students to compare their work. Finally, have pairs present their ideas to class.

Quotation Game: Purpose - In preparation for an upcoming test, students create and solve potential problems. Have students count off to form seven groups. Without using their books, have each group write a problem they think the instructor could ask on the next test and write that problem on a flip chart page with a black marker. Create one yourself. Post the eight problems around the room and have students vote on the one they think you (the instructor) wrote. Individually, students now solve the problem for which they voted. Debrief by going through the problems from the one that received the fewest votes to the one that received the most votes. Discuss how to solve each problem and reveal the author(s). Congratulate the group that received the most votes for its problem, perhaps awarding a few bonus points on the upcoming test.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn to apply the Sine Rule to calculate a side or angle of a non-right-angled triangle. Have students read in their text (or other resource) how to use the Sine Rule. Place them in home groups of four and provide each group with the same four questions to solve. Each person in the group volunteers to become the group's expert on solving one of the four problems. Have students solve their chosen problem, either in class or for homework. The expert groups now meet and check each other's solutions, if necessary confirming with the instructor that they have both the correct answer and method for solving. Experts then return to their home group and take turns teaching how to solve their question and answering any concerns of their group members.

Value Line: Purpose - Students understand the benefits of mathematics and are, thus, motivated to do well. This might be a first-day ice-breaker. On a scale of 1-10, have students rate their agreement with the statement, "I see the value of taking this mathematics course." Encourage students to be honest. Have students line up by their number and invite those at each end to share their rationale for their choice. You might repeat this activity at the end of the class to see if attitudes towards math have changed.

Twenty-One & Use/Adapt: Purpose - Students learn new strategies for studying math. Ask students to write on an index card their answer to the following question: "What strategy helps you the most to learn math?" Play Twenty-One to generate a list of the best strategies. In the next class, distribute and discuss a list of the top ten strategies. Ask students to choose one new strategy and write how they will use/adapt it for a week and report their experiences and outcomes to the class.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to solve specific kinds of problems and gain confidence in their ability to do so. Provide students with a problem to solve by themselves (perhaps for homework). Afterwards, have students pair up and compare their solutions and steps. Afterwards, invite students to share their answers and what they learned in conversation with their partner. List on the board what students learned about solving this problem that could be transferred to solve similar problems.

Quotation Game: Purpose - Students' motivation in math increases as they discover personally meaningful answers to the question "Why math?" Have students answer the following on an index card and turn it in anonymously: "On a scale of 0-10 (10 high), what value do you place on doing well in mathematics and why?" Have students count off to form seven groups. Students write a quotation stating what they believe a math expert would say in response to the same question. Create an answer yourself or use the following: "Starting salaries go up $2000 per year for every mathematics course taken after the ninth grade." [Source: Frances Rosamond, Department Chair of Mathematics, National University, quoted in Overcoming Math Anxiety by Sheila Tobias.] Post the eight quotations around the room and have students vote on the one they think is the best reason to do well in mathematics. Debrief by going through the quotations from the one that received the fewest votes to the one that received the most votes. Congratulate the groups for their insights on the value of learning math. After the discussion, have students answer the prompt question again and, once again, turn in their cards anonymously. In the next class, report on the average pre- and post-activity scores (ideally they went up) and summarize the reasons given for "Why math?" Consider posting the reasons in the classroom.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students actively review and deepen their understanding of key topics of the course. Students in Home Groups of five choose to become the group's expert in one of the following: 1) Graphing and writing equations of lines, 2) Factoring, 3) Solving systems of equations, 4) Rational expressions/equations, and 5) Word Problems. Tell experts to study their topic and return to the next class ready to share their knowledge. Remind them that they can seek help in the tutoring center. In the next class, have Experts meet to 1) discuss how they will teach their topic and 2) create 5 test questions for their topic. Experts turn in their test questions to the instructor; then they return to their home groups to teach their topic. Instructor announces that s/he will include some of the best student-created questions on the next test.

PMI+Q: Purpose - In statistics, students gain an understanding of the importance of choosing the best type of graph to display data. Students display given data in a pie chart and in a histogram. They then create a list of the pluses and minuses of each graph's effectiveness, what interests them about each graph, and questions they have about the graph. Afterwards, in a whole-group setting, discuss pluses, minuses, interests, and questions.

Card Swap: Purpose – Students learn to analyze and write good definitions, to better support problem solving procedures. Discuss the attributes of a well-written definition. Students break up into groups; each person writes a definition specified by instructor. Swap cards. Each group decides which card has the best-written definition, identifying the attributes and ambiguities they observed. Then report to class for class discussion.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn to solve a variety of applied problems using systems of equations (to be done after several in-class examples). In Home Groups of three, students are given a handout with a motion problem (distance, rate, time), an investment problem, and a mixture problem. Each student chooses a problem. Expert groups then work together to solve the problem and make sure all thoroughly understand the process and solution. Students return to home groups to teach their problem type to the other group members.

Gallery Walk: Purpose – Students improve their skills at simplifying rational expressions. Post eight to ten rational expressions along with the simplified expressions (some erroneously simplified). Students are given two colors of dots: one indicates that the rational expression has been correctly simplified and another color indicates that it has been incorrectly simplified. Have students work in pairs so they can discuss the accuracy of the expressions. Students vote with dots. Each simplification is discussed after the walk.

Who’s the Expert: Purpose – Learn to analyze and find errors in problems. In groups of four, have students write a problem and solution with a specified error on a flipchart page. Post anonymous student flipcharts along with a correctly solved problem. Students then vote individually with dots for the correct solution. Follow up with a discussion of what techniques were used to find the errors.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn to convert, add, subtract and multiply/divide mixed numbers. DAY 1: Divide students into home groups. Have students choose from the following subjects on which to become an expert: 1) convert fractions to mixed numbers and mixed numbers to fractions, 2) add mixed numbers, 3) subtract mixed numbers, 4) multiplying and dividing mixed numbers. Direct students to material and exercises to help them become experts. Give them until the following class period to prepare. DAY 2: Experts on each topic meet to discuss their work and teaching strategies and come up with five test questions. Students return to home groups. Experts teach home groups and test others on what they have learned.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – Review math skills in a math skills workshop. Present a problem and ask students to solve individually. Then pair students and share solution with partner. Have volunteers write solution on the board and lead class discussion.

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Microbiology (1)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn how to write a clear, concise, but thorough response to an essay exam question. Inform students of the general assignment (although not the specific question) prior to the class period so that they may prepare. In class, provide an essay question that is representative of a question that could be asked on an exam, and give a limited time period in which students write an answer to the question. Students then play "Twenty-One," exchanging and assigning points to the answers. When done, facilitate a discussion about which answers were scored the highest, and what components made them successful.

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Music (4)

Quotation Game & Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students learn essential truths about the impact of music on the brain and human behavior. Form seven groups of students and provide each group with a list of experts' statements about the effect that music has on the brain and human behavior. Students use these quotations to determine the essential truth about this topic, write their own quotation on a flip chart page, and post them around the room (along with the added expert's quotation). In a Gallery Walk, students place stickers on the one they think is the expert's quotation. Debrief the activity by discussing the "essential truths" expressed by the five quotations receiving the most votes.

Value Line: Purpose - Students improve their listening skills with regard to matching the tuning note. Directions: Play recordings of student attempting to match a tuning note. Have the class members evaluate each student's success by their place in the value line (1 = totally out of tune & 10 = perfectly in tune). Discuss each evaluation.

Value Line: Purpose - Students learn to evaluate a performance. Students observe and listen to a live or recorded performance and then rate that performance (1-10) on vocal quality, diction, interpretation, breath control, style, and overall performance (1=low/10=high). Lead a discussion on the quality of the performance and possible ways to improve it. Require students to use technical terminology.

Who’s the Expert? Purpose - Students discover music writing techniques, write music and compare/analyze examples. Divide students into groups of three (one group of two or four if needed). Provide students with eight short phrases of music written by period composers demonstrating the technique/style to be learned (eg, Bach chorales). Students examine the excerpts, derive rules and principles in creating that musical style, and compose a similar example of their own as a group. The professor displays and performs the resulting compositions, as well as another example by a professional composer. Each student votes on two musical phrases they think were written by the "expert," with results discussed afterwards. This may be particularly interesting if the expert example doesn't strictly follow all stylistic rules.

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Nursing (also see Health Occupations) (15)

Who’s the Expert?: Purpose - Students explore and exchange ideas about the concept of "health." In seven groups of three to five, students read ten definitions of "health" by various experts. Then they create a group definition, write it on a flip-chart page, and return to the teacher. The teacher posts the definitions, including, without the student’s knowledge, one expert definition. The students score definitions, top three are discussed, groups who wrote them applauded, and expert definition is revealed.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn the Nursing Process: Assess, Diagnose, Plan, Implement, Evaluate (ADPIE). Students in Home Groups of 5 each choose to become the group's expert on one of the components of the Nursing Process and study provided information (e.g., textbook chapter). Expert groups then meet and deepen their understanding of their component and create ways to help their home groups understand it. Experts return to their home groups and teach their topic. Instructor then quizzes the entire class to assure they understand the key issues. Thereafter, Experts wear a tag that indicates their expertise, allowing other students to seek them out as consultants.

Case Study: Purpose - Students learn critical thinking skills while defending a position in a complex medical situation. Present students with a real-life medical case such as that of Karen Ann Quinlan or Terri Schiavo, young women who fell into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). The case should include information about the controversies that ensued concerning whether or not to keep them alive through extraordinary means. Have students research what transpired in the real case and write a paper in defense of either maintaining or curtailing life support. The culmination of the assignment is a debate, followed by a vote to maintain life support or not.

Quick List, Whole-Group Discussion & Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students determine the inner qualities of a successful nurse, assess themselves for these qualities, and create a plan to strengthen their greatest weakness. Have students individually create a quick-list of the "Inner Qualities of Successful Nurses." Next, conduct a whole group discussion to combine all of the lists (eliminating duplications), writing the compiled list on a white board or flip-chart paper. Conduct a Gallery Walk, asking students to vote for the three most important inner qualities. Voting can be done with markers or stick-on colored dots. Based on the voting, create a top ten list of "Inner Qualities of Successful Nurses." Finally, have each student identify his/her weakest quality and make a plan to strengthen that quality during the semester, writing a paper on the experiences, outcomes and lessons learned.

Corners: Purpose - Students learn to prioritize interventions in a medical emergency. Provide a list of four nursing interventions for a patient experiencing congestive heart failure. Designate one corner of the room for each intervention. Have students go to the corner of the intervention they think is the most important and, as a group, develop their reasoning. A spokesperson from each corner presents reasons for the group’s choice. Afterwards, provide students with the accepted prioritization as determined by the medical community.

Case Study & Popcorn Reading: Purpose - Students learn the Have students "popcorn" read a case in which a nurse discovers that another nurse - a close friend who recently had back surgery - is stealing prescription pain killers. Students discuss what they would do upon making such a discovery; then have them read related laws and learn the actual legal consequences of their proposed choices.

Case Study, Corners, & PMI+ Q: Purpose - Students review the use of Fosamax as well as spark discussion of other treatments for osteoporosis. Provide a case study such as the following: "Ms C. is a 42-year-old woman who had a total hysterectomy, including removal of both ovaries, four years ago. She has just been diagnosed with osteoporosis. Her doctor prescribed a bisphosphonate (Foxamax)." Divide the class into corners and have each group identify PMI-Q related to treating this woman with Fosamax. After hearing the PMI from each group, make a list of any questions generated and have students research the answers for homework.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn about four different drug classifications for oral anti-diabetic agents. Ask students to bring a resource to class that they frequently use as a reference for medications. Identify four drug classifications. Each student in the home group selects one of these classifications to research: identifying the purpose, side effects, and administration guidelines. In expert group, students deepen their expertise on their chosen drug classification, and then they return to their home group to teach what they have learned.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students practice diagnosing patients and evaluating prescribed medications. Provide students with various case studies of patients presenting with a chief complaint, list of symptoms, lab values, medications and any pertinent history. THINK (solo): Students have 10 minutes to develop a probable diagnosis for the patient and decide whether the prescribed medications are correct for the diagnosis. Students determine what the priorities should be for this patient and the nursing goals/outcomes. PAIR: Students have 10 minutes to pair up with another student and compare their decisions and make adjustments. SHARE: Each pair shares their summary to see if there is class consensus. Instructor is able to critique the final response, thereby clarifying any misconceptions.

Case Study: Purpose - Students learn to better organize their work process and identify and prioritize tasks. Ask students to read a study of a typical day in the life of a med/surg nurse who is caring for five patients in an 8-hour day. Ask students to create a timeline of this nurse’s work day. Students may work in pairs. Have students share orally with the group. Encourage students to give feedback.

Case Study with Value Line: Purpose – Students learn the importance of "understanding" math vs. "doing" math to ensure proper dosage of meds. Students will read a scenario where the hospital pharmacy has mislabeled a medicine to be administered to a patient. The nursing supervisor asks another nurse to administer the medicine. Students will then assess responsibility of key players and finish with a Value Line discussion of their choices.

Think /Pair/Share: Purpose - to encourage teamwork and critical thinking. When students are at a point in a simulation where they are unsure what action to take, pause the simulation, and have each participant write five possible interventions. Then, in pairs, have students discuss and prioritize their lists of actions. Continue the simulations and ask for possible interventions.

Quiz/Quiz/Trade: Purpose – Review a specific disease process. On each card list categories such as pathophysiology, pharmacology, nursing directions, nursing interventions, etc. Have each student describe the information related to their topic and then quiz a partner on that category.

Fish Bowl: Purpose – Students practice interviewing a "patient" for a health history. Two students in the "fish bowl" play the roles of nurse and patient, with the nurse asking the patient appropriate diagnostic questions. When a student in the rim of the fish bowl wants to add a new question or is asked for help, that student becomes the nurse and continues the interview. After the interview is over, the "patient" becomes the new interviewer for a new patient.

Value Line: Purpose – Learn prioritization and Management of Care skills. Have eight patients who have walked into the E.R. Have students rank patients from most critical to least critical in the order the patients should be seen. Do a value line for some of the patients, lining up by the number the patient was ranked to be seen (1-8). Discuss why certain patients should be seen first, second, etc…

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Orientation (4)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn budgeting ideas from their peers during entrance counseling. Have students write on an index card the answer to "What is your best budgeting tip/advice?" Then play Twenty-One to generate a Top 10 list of best budgeting tips that the students can write record and use.

Quick List and Pair/Share: Purpose - Students identify qualities of successful students and their own qualities. Have students in pairs brainstorm a list of qualities they believe successful students have. Next, with partner, have each student identify two qualities he or she has and one quality he or she believes could be strengthened. Share qualities with entire group.

Think/Pair/Square/Share and Handup/Standup: Purpose - Icebreaker, transitioning from high school to college. Pose the question: What are the qualities and habits of successful college students? Have each student come up with his/her own list of activities they use or have observed others use to be successful. Once completed, have them pair up (handup/standup) and share their lists, with one reading/explaining while the other listens carefully; reverse roles. Square off with another group and have each person explain their respective partner's list of qualities-habits.

Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students Learn How they can overcome barriers to college success. Have each student write on flip chart pages one major barrier that may interfere with his/her college success. Place posters on a wall and have each student put a colored dot beside their top three choices. Identify the most-chosen barriers, and discuss several options on how students can overcome those specific barriers and complete a college degree.

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Philosophy / Ethics (1)

Case Study & Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to apply ethical decision-making model to specific ethical dilemmas. Individuals read ethics cases and select courses of action. Then they pair with another student to compare their recommended action. Then pairs group with another pair. Each Member shares a highlight from the partner’s action. All four attempt to create one action that keeps the good outcomes of each action while avoiding the downfalls of each.

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Physics (5)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn how physics is relevant to their lives. Provide students with a list of physics principles. Have each student choose one principle and write on an index card how s/he could use the principle to enhance success and enjoyment in work or play. Next, play Twenty-One to identify the strongest ideas. This activity could be done at the end of a course as a review. Variation: Do this activity both at the beginning and end of the course to see the impact of the semester's instruction. In this case, have students put their names on their first card and collect it. At the end of the semester, after playing Twenty-One, return students' first card and have them compare what they wrote at the beginning and at the end of the course.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students learn Newton’s Laws of Motion (action-reaction, acceleration, inertia). In home groups of three, students choose their topic and use their text, notes from instructor and various supplies provided by instructor to develop expertise. The expert groups discuss/learn their topics and develop activities using supplies provided by instructor (or other things they come up with) to demonstrate their law of motion to their home group. Each home group chooses the best demo to share with class.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students explore the relationship between force and energy. Have students write an answer to the following question on an index card: "What relationship does an external force acting on an object have with the energy of that object?" Play Twenty-One to generate a list of relationships between force and energy. Distribute the list as a study guide handout.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn factors that contribute to the distribution of force. Experiment – package an egg in a container and drop from a considerable height; 1) one container where egg does not break, 2) second container where egg breaks. Students answer the question; what contributed to the force exerted on the egg? Then facilitate Twenty-One to find the highest scoring answers.

Fish Bowl: Purpose - Get the students to identify the basic physics concept underlying an action. Give students a scenario and an outcome, for example where two objects collide and then move in the wrong direction. Ask them to decide if they think this is what would really happen (or is it physically impossible) and why, by identifying what principle is at play (for example, breaking conservation of momentum). Have them give their answers and try to justify it in fish bowl.

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Political Science (1)

Value Line: Purpose - To generate more interest in debating political issues. State a political issue and then have the students line up from "strongly support" to "strongly oppose." Invite the students at the extreme ends to share why they believe the way they do.

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Professional Development (4)

Value Line: Purpose - Faculty within a department begin to norm grading rubrics for an introductory course. Faculty members rate their agreement (10) or disagreement (1) on the following statement: "Students in this course should be rewarded for effort and improvement rather than solely academic performance." Faculty members align themselves and share their rationale, with the goal of moving to a closer consensus.

Twenty-One and PMI+Q: Purpose – To help faculty feel more confident in using group work with their students. Faculty write a best practice for group work on an index card answering, "What is a critical component in conducting group work?" Play Twenty-One to generate top-ten list. Assemble list to distribute to faculty.

Value Line: Purpose – To discuss learning outcome statements to use in a department (e.g., competencies, objectives, learning methods). Have faculty select the top five learning outcome statements submitted from faculty and use the value line as an opportunity to defend/explain their choices.

Case Study: Purpose - To train academic advisers in the regulations and laws regarding FERPA. Have advisers read actual case studies of advising sessions that required the application of one or more FERPA guidelines. Advisers then discuss how and why FERPA was or was not applied in each case. Follow this with further discussion of FERPA regulations.

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Psychology (4)

Video & PMI-Q: Purpose - Students in a child development course analyze "The Business of Being Born." After viewing the documentary, students use PMI+Q to write a response in their journals. They then join a smaller group based on the area of PMI-Q that they would like to explore more thoroughly (e.g., a group of pluses). Afterwards, lead a whole-group discussion exploring what each group generated as Pluses, Minuses, Interesting ideas, and remaining questions.

PMI+Q: Purpose - Students challenge, question, clarify, and generate new ideas about positive psychology. After a brief overview of positive psychology (defined as looking at what is right with people as opposed to what is wrong ), students break into groups of four. In groups, students brainstorm Quick Lists of four responses to Plus, Minus, Interesting, and Questions. Students offer suggestions as to how individuals can optimize well-being.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn the major schools of thought in psychology. In Home Groups of five students, each student chooses a school or philosophy of consciousness; then using their textbook and lecture materials students develop a rudimentary understanding. Form Expert Groups to develop five test questions with answers for each philosophy. Return to Home Groups and have each expert teach the respective philosophy, administer their test questions, and discuss the results. Use the best questions generated on the next regular exam.

Value Line: Purpose - Students learn the contribution of nature and nurture to individual characteristics. Students read research that supports 1) human characteristics are determined by their genes (biology) or 2) human characteristics are determined by their experiences. Have students determine their agreement on a continuum (1=genes…10=exp). Lead a discussion of the support for both sides allowing students to move along the line.

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Public Health (1)

Case Study & Role Playing: Purpose - Learning about problem solving and the scientific method in public health, and the interrelationship between science, society, culture and health. Students are presented with a pellagra epidemic case study from the early 1900's. They then form groups that are public health investigators working with Dr. Goldberg of PHS to solve the pellagra problem. Step by step, the students advise...

  1. What do you need to find out about patients?
  2. What does (1) indicate about the cause of pellagra?
  3. What does (2) indicate about a solution?
  4. Present actual results of intervention.
  5. Conclusion? Then ask, "Why was this ignored?"
  6. Introduce social and political dimensions of pellagra epidemic.
  7. Reflect on what are proximate and ultimate causes.

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Science (1)

Who’s the Expert? Purpose – Evaluating the quality of source data. Give students data from ten different sources that could be used to support a specific experimental observation. Use a modification of "Who’s the Expert" and ask student groups to explain, in 100 words or less, which source data is the best example. Student groups write their explanations on a flipchart page and post on the wall. Then, all students pick the best explanation and discuss.

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Sociology (1)

Value Line: Purpose - Students learn to appreciate/understand differing perspectives on current issues. Students read a controversial statement, for example, "Gay and lesbian couples should have the right to adopt children." Students rate agreement with the statement from 1 (totally agree) to 10 (totally disagree). Students line up according to their agreement/disagreement with the statement. Instructor asks students to share feelings and opinions regarding the statement.

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Speech (2)

Case Study: Purpose - Students improve interpersonal communication skills through reading and discussing a provocative case study. Ask students to read an article that describes a moral dilemma and several ways the dilemma might be addressed through interpersonal communication. Examples might be third party infidelity, criminal activity by a friend, or lying as a positive strategy. Ask students to choose the most appropriate way to address the dilemma. Discuss in pairs/small groups/as a whole class.

Value Line: Purpose - Support student getting over fear of speaking in class. Use 3 x 5 card to write down what scares you the most about speaking in public. Collect the cards and create a list of the top 10. The next day hand out the list and have students rate them. Form the Value Line. Talk to the person next to you, then go down the line for student input (so each student is "talking"). Fold the line and have a discussion with the person opposite you.

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Student Activities (1)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Decision-making process for student clubs to select activities. Have students write ideas for club activities on an index card; then do Twenty-One to evaluate the ideas to determine which ideas have more support and which ideas should be tabled. This is a fair, anonymous way for ideas to be weighed on their merits, independent of the individuals offering them.

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Student Success / FYE (35)

Value Line: Purpose – To help students clarify what it takes to be successful in college. Have students place value numbers on the benefit of personal qualities needed to be successful in college (e.g., personal responsibility, self-motivation, etc.) Have classmates discuss in pairs why they ranked qualities the way they did. Follow with a whole-group discussion.

Who’s the Expert & Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students explore reasons for going to college and develop personal motivation statements. During New Student Orientation, break students into small groups. Ask them to read statements written by experts about the value of a college education. Ask students to glean essential truths from the statements and, as a group, create and write a statement about the value of college on a piece of flip chart paper to be displayed for other students in a Gallery Walk. Students evaluate posted statements and use colored dots to vote for their two favorites. To wrap up the activity, discuss the results of the voting, and ask students to write on an index card why they are going to college. Provide glitter, stickers, and colored markers so that students can decorate their cards to keep in school binders or notebooks as a reminder of their motivation for college success.

Gallery Walk: Purpose – To learn about college resources. Provide brochures and information for college resources such as tutoring, financial aid, counseling, advising, events, leadership clubs and sports. Break students up into each resource and have them write on a poster: what, where, when, and why. Post each on the wall and have students mark the resource they are most likely to use. Provide information on top two and bottom two.

Value Line: Purpose – To introduce the concept of interdependence and group work in a way that allows people to explore personal thoughts and feelings about asking for help, relying on others, working together and sharing/ co-owning results and outcomes. Create 2 posters and hang them. 1. I am much more comfortable and prefer working independently and alone than working in groups. 2. I am completely comfortable working in groups and prefer working in pairs, groups, and teams. Have students place themselves between signs according to preference. Ask for statements from most extreme student positions. Facilitate discussion with emphasis on differences, similarities, and concerns and positives.

PMI+Q: Purpose – Have students thoughtfully evaluate the benefits of taking out student loans. During new student orientation, a Financial Aid Advisor uses PMI+Q as an evaluation tool to help students determine if taking out student loans is right for them. Ask students to explain the pluses of borrowing, the minuses, what’s interesting about taking on debt, and then ask what questions they have.

Who's the Expert?: Purpose – Students evaluate and practice creating personal philosophy of success statements. Have students read selected quotes about the components of personal success. In small groups, ask students to come up with their own "mock" expert quote about success. Play "Who's the Expert?" Then, facilitate a discussion about the components of success. Next, have students individually write their own statements of personal success. This statement forms the basis of an essay they later write describing what success means to them and strategies they will use to be successful.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose – Students explore and are exposed to new ideas, concepts, qualities of values/value oriented words. Have students work alone and make a list of what they consider a personal value. Then pair the students to have them compare their ideas, concepts, qualities. Reassemble as an entire class and have students share their answers. This will then give the class new options and ideas so that they can then generate their own list of personal core values.

Twenty-One: Purpose – Students learn the value and understand their rights and responsibilities of the student Code of Conduct. Have students answer on their index card, "why does the college have a code of conduct?" Generate a top 5 list by playing Twenty-One and through discussion answers to the question. Publish list as a resource for students.

PMI-Q: Purpose – Students analyze college resources available to them. After students compile and present resources, have each student write about the pluses of each resource, the minuses, what’s interesting about each resource, and any questions that they still have.

Value Line: Purpose – Students learn self-awareness. Have students rank the 8 Choices of Successful Students from 1 to 8 according to 1=most true of me through 8=least true of me. Have students line up for each choice according to the number they assigned that choice; lead discussion on why they assessed themselves as they did. Perhaps repeat activity at the end of the course and discuss any changes.

Case Study & Thirty-Five: Purpose - Students learn that they can shape the outcomes of their lives by looking for the best choice in every situation. Have students read "The Purchased Paper" (case study). After students score the characters regarding their responsibility for Edgar's failing grade, hold a discussion about the reasons for their choices. At an appropriate point in the conversation, raise the following question: "When Edgar learned that his roommate had put Edgar's name on a purchased paper and delivered it to Mrs. Pine's office, what would have been Edgar's wisest choice at that moment?" Have students each write their answer on an index card in 100 words or less. Then play Thirty-Five to identify and discuss the best answers. Lead students to see that empowered people examine their options carefully and then make the choice(s) that will maximize the odds of achieving their desired outcomes and experiences.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students understand that success begins inside. Have students write on an index card their answer to the following question: "In your opinion, what is the one most important inner quality that successful students have and struggling students do not? Explain your choice in 100 words or less." Play Twenty-One and identify the cards that received the top five scores. Hold a discussion of the qualities identified on these cards, making a list on the board. Continue the discussion by asking what qualities are missing from the list. In an On Course class, have students compare their list to the Eight Qualities of Successful Students that is on the inside front cover of the text.

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn about and use campus resources. In Step A, place students in groups of four and ask them to each select one of four campus resources (e.g., tutoring center, library, financial aid office, and counseling center). Discuss how they might become their group’s expert on their chosen campus resource; then give them a week to gather information. In Step B, have experts for each campus resource gather and create a list of "The Top 10 Things to Know about ______." In Step C, experts return to their home group to teach others their Top 10. Afterwards, provide handouts of the Top 10 Lists and/or post the list on a class website or discussion board.

Value Line: Purpose - Students find ways to stay motivated in college. Provide students with a list of nine beliefs and behaviors that could influence their motivation in college. (There is such a list in the On Course text in the "Embracing Change" activity after Journal Entry 11.) Ask students to rank these beliefs and behaviors from 1 (most helpful) to 9 (least helpful). Have students do a value line for each of the nine (or as many as you have time for) and discuss their reasons. Afterwards, ask if any students have raised or lowered their score for any of the nine choices. Finally, ask students to implement one belief or behavior for one week and report their experiences and outcomes to the class.

Quotation Game: Purpose - Students learn the value of effective self-management. As a way of introducing this topic, gather a group of quotations about the value of effective self-management. For example, "Research shows that one's ability to manage time-specifically time on task-is a better indicator of success in the first year of college than SAT test scores and high school grades." Have seven groups of students analyze the quotations to determine the essential truths about the value of effective self-management. Then have each group write its own quotation about the value of self-management and play Thirty-Five. Lead a class discussion about the essential truths expressed by the top scoring quotations.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students learn to use self-management tools to make better use of their time. Have each student choose a self-management tool (monthly calendar, to-do list, etc.) that they will experiment with for a week. Alert them that at the end of the experiment, they will be reporting their experiences to a partner. At the end of the week, have them pair with another student. (You might want to pair them with someone who experimented with the same tool…or with a different tool.) Have students show their self-management tool to their partner and explain 1) what they actually did with the tool (including nothing, if that is the case), 2) their experiences using the tool (e.g., sense of control, overwhelm, peace, efficiency, etc.) 3) their outcomes using the tool (e.g., competed all homework, scheduled "fun," fell further behind, caught up on reading in history), and 4) their lessons learned. Finally, have student share with the class the most significant things their partner told them.

PMI+ Q: Purpose - Students learn a new study skill; additionally, they practice writing. From their text, each student identifies a study skill that s/he has never used before and experiments with it for one week. Students then write a five-paragraph essay about the study skill, each paragraph answering one of the following questions: 1) What are the pluses of the study skill? 2) What are the minuses? 3) What is interesting about the study skill? 4) What questions do they still have about the study skill? 5) Will they continue to use the study skill or not...and why?

Twenty-One & Use/Adapt: Purpose - Students learn better self-management skills, becoming more efficient and effective. Have students write on an index card their response to the following prompt: "What is a strategy you use to manage your time effectively? Explain how you use it." Play Twenty-One to generate a list of the best strategies. In the next class, distribute a list of the strategies and ask students to do an experiment. The experiment is to use or adapt one new strategy for a week and report their experiences and outcomes to the class.

Quick List: Purpose - Students see their growth during the course. On the first day of class, ask students to make a quick list of the Inner Qualities of Successful Students. Have students put their name on the list. Collect the lists and save them. On the last day of the class, ask students (again) to make a quick list of the Inner Qualities of Successful Students. After they complete their list, hand back the lists they created during the first class. Give them time to compare their two lists and write a paragraph about their most important lessons learned in the class. Invite students to share with the class their most important lessons learned and any commitments they are willing to make to be successful in college.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn the value of study groups. Have students write on an index card an answer to the question: "What is the greatest benefit of a study group?" Then play Twenty-One to generate a Top 10 List of the benefits of participating in a study group. Publish the list on a handout or class website.

Value Line: Purpose - Students realistically examine their level of Interdependence and understand the benefits of being Interdependent. Have students rate themselves on the following statement from 1 (completely untrue of me) to 10 (completely true of me): I readily accept and seek offers of assistance to help me achieve my goals and be a successful student. Line students up from 1-10, and ask them to explain reasons for their score, encouraging them to provide specific examples to explain their belief. Further, encourage a spirited debate with respect for all. Particularly have those with high scores provide anecdotes of when being interdependent helped them to be successful. This structure could be used with any On Course principle!

Jigsaw: Purpose - Students learn how to prepare for different types of questions on an exam: essay, multiple choice, problem solution and short answer. In Home Groups, students each choose one kind of question and then begin to develop study strategies for it. In Expert Groups, students deepen their understanding of how to answer the type of question they have chosen and create sample exam questions (with answers) to illustrate. Experts return to the home groups to teach others. Afterwards results are collected to create a master Test-Taking Strategy Guide for the class.

Think/Pair/Share and Gallery Walk: Purpose - Students learn and share ways to reduce text anxiety. Ask student to list 5 ways of reducing text anxiety. Have students pair up, discuss their ideas, and reduce their 10 ideas to a list of the best three. Next have pairs represent their three best ideas on flip chart pages using only graphics (no words). Do a gallery walk, having students place stars on their favorite ideas. Finally, lead a discussion of the methods of reducing test anxiety that received the most votes.

Quotation Game: Purpose - Students learn about different theories of motivation and find one that helps with their own motivation in college. Provide students with a handout containing a number of quotations from experts about motivation. In small groups, students identify the essential truths of motivation, create their own expert-like quotation, and write it on a flip chart page. Students vote on their choice for the motivational theory that seems most helpful to them. Finally, lead a discussion about what motivates the students in your class. As homework, have students write a paragraph about one strategy they will experiment with to maintain or increase their level of academic motivation.

Twenty-One & Value Line: Purpose - Students evaluate what made them successful or not successful in their first semester; subsequent students benefit from what they learned. At the end of the first semester, have students write on an index card an answer to the question, "What one piece of advice would you give to new students about being successful in college?" Play Twenty-One to generate a Top 10 List of Advice. Publish the list on handout to be given out to both this semester's and next-semester's students. As a first-day activity with next-semester's students, give out the Top 10 List of Advice and do a Value Line for each suggestion. Ask the new students why they think last-semester's students selected each piece of advice.

Read Around / Who’s the Expert? Purpose – To familiarize students with financial concepts regarding student borrowing/repayment/bankruptcy. Form seven groups and provide groups with quotations from experts about borrowing money to finance a college degree. Have groups do a Read Around and then create a statement about student borrowing on a flip-chart page. Tape all the statements, including an expert statement, on the wall. After taking a gallery walk and voting on the top three, discuss the winning statements and the lessons learned about the pluses and minuses of borrowing to finance a college degree.

Case Study: Purpose – Students learn what "courage" has to do with self-esteem. Give out case study about a returning student who encounters and overcomes challenges in her first semester. Have students identify the ways in which the student is courageous. Create a list. Then have students create their own list of challenges they have overcome.

Card Swap (variation of Twenty-One): Purpose – Students learn different ways to problem-solve through other student’s experiences. Have students write about what they’ve struggled with in school so far (time management, studying, etc.) and what steps they’ve taken to help with that (or if they haven’t done anything to solve it, then one idea of what they can try). Students swap cards and share experiences and solutions.

Value Line: Purpose - Students explore their relationship with the world around them. Create a list of ten current event topics from the world, politics, business and at home at your college or university. Have students rank them based on a perception of how much each issue affects their lives. Conduct a value line discussion to raise awareness of the individual issues as well as support the development of the student's role in their world.

Think/Pair/Share: Purpose - Students share and learn ways to better manage their time. Have students write a paragraph on how they manage their time. Then pair students and have them discuss effective time management skills, including their best ideas. Finally discuss as a whole group to identify best practices for time management from the group.

Twenty-One: Purpose - Students learn to identify when they are off course. Ask students to complete the statement: "I sometimes sabotage my goals when I..." Play Twenty-One to generate a top ten list of signs that signal a student is off course. Publish the list on class website.

Twenty-One/Corners: Purpose - Students learn they are not alone and discover some strategies to use when they face a roadblock. Ask the question, "What is your greatest fear/challenge in your pursuit to earn your college degree?" Have students write their answer on an index card. Have them play Twenty-One to generate the top 4. Then place each of the 4 fears/challenges as a topic in each of 4 corners. Each corner brainstorms strategies for overcoming fear/challenge. Make a list. Distribute to be kept in front of notebook.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Prepare for chapter test by creating questions in different formats. In Home groups, have students choose a question format: multiple choice, fill in the blank, True/False (etc.). Students then search the chapter for possible test questions using their chosen format. In Expert groups, students develop questions in their chosen format. Back in Home groups, students quiz group members and give correct answer. Finally, groups turn in questions to the teacher to be used on the next test.

Value Line: Purpose – To help student determine the inner qualities they will need to be successful in college. Create a case study (modeled after Popson’s Dilemma) in which a struggling new student asks eight more experienced and successful students what he needs to be successful in college. The eight students each tell the new student about one of the eight On Course principles. Now ask the class to rate the importance of all eight inner qualities from 1 (most important) to 8 (least important). Present the class with one inner quality (e.g., self-awareness) and have students form a value line from 1 to 8. Lead a discussion in which students explain their reasons for rankings.

Jigsaw: Purpose – Students learn the eight On Course inner qualities. In Home Groups of Four, each student chooses to become the group’s expert in one of the first four Inner Qualities (Self-Responsibility, Self-Motivation, Self-Management, and Interdependence). Expert group’s meet throughout the time that the class studies these four inner qualities. At the end of this time period, experts return to their home groups and share what they consider to be the most important aspects of the inner quality in which they are now expert. After forming new home groups, this strategy can be repeated with the second four Inner Qualities (Self-Awareness, Lifelong Learning, Emotional Intelligence, and Believe in Yourself).

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Trades (1)

Quick List: Purpose - Workers/participants can recognize the variety of safety issues/areas in the workplace. Participants create a quick list of potential safety issues in the workplace. Invite participants to pair up with another and share each list adding to their own personal list. Invite participants to rotate to another partner. Facilitate discussion about the areas.

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Tutor Training (2)

Twenty-One: Purpose - Tutors learn ways to help students come to the tutoring center fully prepared. Have tutors respond to the question, "What can you do to increase the likelihood that a student who has not completed her homework will be better prepared at the next tutoring session?" Play Twenty-One to generate a list of the top five strategies. Have students practice the strategies in pairs (role play). In future sessions, invite tutors to share stories of using one of the strategies, along with an explanation of how well it worked.

PMI-Q: Purpose - Have tutors analyze the Socratic method of working with their tutees. Have tutors review information given to them on the Socratic method during tutor training. Have tutors decide what would be a plus, minus, interesting or questions they have about the method. Share the ideas with the group to compare answers and discuss the questions.

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