MAIN CONFERENCE SCHEDULE AND SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

 

“These aren’t just good strategies (and they are!) but, when integrated systematically, they are transformative experiences for both students and instructors.” –Jim Kain, Neumann University, PA

The 2017 conference will be held at the Doubletree Hilton Anaheim-Orange County, CA on April 20-22, 2017.

For the April 20th Pre-Conference schedule please click here.


MAIN CONFERENCE SCHEDULE:

Friday, April 21
6:45am-8:15am Conference Check-in and Hosted Hot Breakfast Buffet
8:30am-10:00am Session #1: Opening Session (90 Minutes)
10:00am-10:30am Networking and Beverage Break
10:30am-12:00pm Session #2: Breakout Sessions (90 Minutes)
12:00pm-1:00pm Hosted Buffet Lunch
1:15pm-2:45pm Session #3: Breakout Sessions (90 Minutes)
2:45pm-3:15pm Networking and Beverage Break
3:15pm-4:15pm Session #4: Breakout Sessions (60 Minutes)
4:30pm-5:30pm Session #5: Poster Sessions and reception to Honor Presenters – Everyone Welcome (snacks and cash bar)
Saturday, April 22
6:45am-8:15am Hosted Hot Buffet Breakfast
8:30am-9:30am Session #6: Breakout Sessions (60 minutes)
9:45am-11:15am Session #7: Breakout Sessions (90 minutes)
11:15am-11:45am Networking and Beverage Break
11:45am-12:45pm Session #8: Closing Session (60 minutes)

 

Thank you for putting this together and having good presenters with valuable content.– Sylwia Kulczak, Rio Hondo College, CA

Thank you – this was an amazing conference! – Nicole Adsitt, Cayuga Community College, NY

2017 Keynote Session with Dr. Daniel Schwartz
Session 1A: The ABCs of How We Learn: 26 Scientifically Proven Approaches


dan-schwartz-stanford


Dr. Daniel Schwartz is the Dean of the Stanford Graduate School of Education, and Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology. Dr. Schwartz studies student understanding and representation and the ways that technology can facilitate learning. He works at the intersection of cognitive science, computer science, and education, examining cognition and instruction in individual, cross-cultural, and technological settings. He serves on the National Academy of Sciences committee, writing How People Learn II. Among many honors, he was named Graduate School of Education Teacher of the Year for 2015.

Dr. Daniel Schwartz holds a BA (Philosophy and Anthropology) from Swarthmore College, an MA (Computers and Education) from Columbia University, and a PhD (Human Cognition and Learning) from Columbia University.

He has taught math at a day school in rural Kenya, English in a south-central junior high school in the Los Angeles Unified School District, and math, science, reading and language arts to junior high and high school students in the rural village of Kaltag, Alaska. He has also been a Mathematics teacher at Kitiwanga Day School in Kenya, and a teacher of Remedial Reading and Writing at John Muir Jr. High, in Los Angeles.

Dr. Schwartz is the author of dozens of articles and books, and his current book translates the science of learning into practice: The ABCs of How We Learn: 26 Scientifically Proven Approaches, How They Work, and When to Use Them (Schwartz, D. L., Tsang, J. M., & Blair, K. P., 2016). He is also the author of Measuring What Matters Most: Choice-Based Assessments for the Digital Age (Schwartz, D. L., & Arena, D. (2013).

Dr. Schwartz believes that “Current assessments perpetuate beliefs that the proper outcomes of learning are static facts and routine skills—stuff that is easy to score as right or wrong. Interest, curiosity, identification, self-efficacy, belonging, and all the other goals of informal learning cannot even sit at the assessment table, because these outcomes are too far removed from current beliefs about what is really important. If the fog were lifted, we would see that most of the stakeholders in education care first and foremost about people’s abilities to make good choices. Making good choices depends on what people know, but it also depends on much more, including interest, persistence, and a host of twenty-first-century soft skills that are critical to learning. In relation to those aspects of the future that are less stable, though, people will need to choose whether, what, when, and how to learn. Hence, it is important to focus on choices that influence learning, and assessments should measure those choices. Choice is the critical outcome of learning, not knowledge. Knowledge is an enabler; choice is the outcome.”

2017 Program

Breakout Sessions (60 minutes)

    Session XX: An Introduction to On Course (MS, PC)
    Presenter: Deb Poese, Director, School of Education/Faculty, Mathematics, Montgomery College, MD
    Summary: New to On Course? Wondering what it’s all about? This session will provide an overview of the On Course approach to student success. Participants will learn 1) the success principles that are the foundation of On Course, 2) how On Course is different from most student success approaches, 3) data demonstrating the success of this method, and 4) On Course resources available to support your students’ academic success and retention.

    Session XX: Building Positive Self-Esteem through Affirmation and Reflection (RM, EQ)
    Presenter: Stanton G. Reed, Faculty, Business & Accounting, Valencia College, FL
    Summary: Many students’ personal struggles inhibit both their academic and life success. Often times they are conflicted with multiple jobs and various family responsibilities. As a result, students become overwhelmed and withdraw from their academic pursuits. In this session, educators of all disciplines and those individuals involved with student development, will learn techniques to promote student success through “statements of affirmation” and “accounting for yourself.” Participants will engage in lively discussion and receive practical tools to enliven these techniques in their classrooms and workplaces.

    Session XX: On Course Goes to High School: Choosing a Good Road (RF, HC)
    Presenter: Jonathan Brennan, Faculty, English, Mission College, CA
    Summary: How might we improve the excellent results from using On Course with college students? Introduce high school students to a basic set of success principles so that these students can practice life skills before they arrive at college. This session will explore developing college/career readiness in middle/high school students, the latest research on non-cognitive competencies, and how to develop a success pipeline that improves both high school and college retention, persistence and graduation. Educators from all disciplines are encouraged to attend, especially those that are interested in developing partnerships between high schools and colleges.

    Session XX: Learning with Legos® – Using Simple Objects to Teach Abstract Concepts (MS, GA)
    Presenters: Elizabeth Jennison, Faculty, Accounting; Paula Koch, Faculty, Accounting, El Camino College, CA
    Summary: Ever give a lecture and see a sea of blank faces at the end? Students often struggle to understand concepts because they come from an unfamiliar context. As a result, the concepts go right over their heads. We can provide that context by using simple objects such as blocks or candy to simulate real situations. In this session, you will simulate a manufacturing process using Legos®, learn a little business and accounting, and develop creative ideas to teach abstract concepts in your classroom. Simulations with objects are probably most appropriate for business, economics, and STEM disciplines, but can be used in any discipline to make abstract concepts more concrete.

    Session XX: I Am at My Breaking Point! (RM, RF)
    Presenter: Daphne Lightfoot and Sylvia Withers, Completion Coaches, Columbia Basin Community College, WA
    Summary: Do you find that your students start the term fired up, motivated and enthusiastic, only to begin showing signs of apathy halfway through the term? They have the desire but lack the understanding of what it takes to be a successful student. This session will highlight the secret ingredient that, when applied, will maximize the success of students. Participants will engage in learner-centered, interactive tasks as they recognize that perseverance alone may not lead students to the results they are seeking. The session provides practical hands-on tools for participants to implement immediately with struggling students.

    Session XX: Online Language Curricula: Choosing for Student Success (RW, TD)
    Presenters: Gary Smith, Faculty, Spanish, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, TX; Heidi Lockwood, Faculty, Spanish, American Public University
    Summary: It is widely believed that the “age of acquisition” in language learning peaks around the onset of puberty, so that acquiring a new language after this age is much more challenging. This creates significant challenges for traditional Spanish language college students and even more difficulties for the non-traditional student. This presentation will demonstrate how curriculum choice and outside language exposure can both positively and negatively affect student success. Participants will experience the reality that by using the right online-accessible curriculum along with genuine immersion and input/output activities, adult students can experience success in learning Spanish.

    Session XX: Mission Responsible (RM, AE, SL)
    Presenters: Melanie Sanwo, Faculty, English; Cynthia McDonald, Librarian; Tiffany Sarkisian, Faculty, Communications; Nancy Vagim, Faculty, Communications; Darlene Haines, Faculty, History, Clovis Community College, CA
    Summary: Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to round up the usual suspects–the Thinker, the Doer, the Feeler, and the Innovator–and take them to task, making them responsible for themselves. While they remain at large, the suspects’ lack of responsibility leads to cutting class, compromising their grades, and undermining the learning goals of every institution. To assist you in breaking up this ring, we offer this Mission Possible training session, during which senior agents—AKA presenters–will lead field agents–AKA conference participant–through engaging, learner-centered activities they can use throughout the semester to foster responsibility in any classroom across the disciplines. It is not an impossible mission. (This message will self-destruct in 10 seconds.)

    Session XX: Hidden Jewels: Mindsets in the Classroom (BA, PC, EQ)
    Presenter: Traci Robichaud-Holler, Faculty, Professional Development and Business Education, Cuesta College, CA
    Summary: Henry Ford said, “Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t you are right.” As we go through life, we interpret our journeys very differently. Those who view challenges through the growth mind-set perspective tend to delve deep within and discover gifts and traits that they were unaware of. As a result, they master more skills, embrace opportunities, and experience increased success. Participates will learn how to help students transition from a fixed mind-set and move toward a growth-oriented outlook by helping them (1) replace irrational thoughts, (2) challenge their negative self-talk, (3) adjust their perception, (4) change their attitude. If you’re interested in helping your students “think I can do this”—then this workshop is for you!

    Session XX: On Coursing Your College (RF, PC)
    Presenter: Maria Parnell, Faculty, Speech Communications, Eastern Florida State College
    Summary: How deep and far reaching could On Course be at your college? The positive influences of On Course are multi-level, multi-faceted, and multiplying at Eastern Florida State College with actions to embed On Course from individual student empowerment, professional development initiatives, and even the college accreditation process. In this session, you’ll explore the many areas in which OC principles can be fostered and, most importantly how you too can develop your own strategies to help On Course your institution.

    Session XX: The Roadway, Roadblocks, and Rigor of the College Matriculation Process (RM, RF, PG, PC)
    Presenters: David-Anthony Navarro, College Outreach Specialist; Patrick Stumpf, College Activities Coordinator; Ann Brandon, Faculty, English, Clovis Community College, CA
    Summary: For most faculty, the first day of the semester or class session means students have filled a seat. For many students, this may have been an arduous process to make it to the first day of class. It involved the winding roadway of the college matriculation process that is peppered with life’s road blocks and the strictness of each step. We’ll showcase some of the roadblocks and highlight the complexity of each step. We’ll have audience participation asking for solutions to very unique and challenging situations students face and resources to bring resolution. This session is meant to acknowledge the difficulty students face in meeting the requirements of the matriculation process and to work collectively to triage their needs.

    Session XX: Using On Course Principles for Course Redesign (SL, AL)
    Presenter: Corey Daughenbaugh, Faculty, Philosophy, United States Air Force Academy, CO
    Summary: At the United States Air Force Academy, the typical course load emphasizes the sciences and cultivates a somewhat linear approach to problem solving. On the other hand, Philosophy, as an academic discipline and practice, invites the student to consider problems in a more abstract and occasionally indirect method, which challenges the ideals students have already begun to internalize. This session will highlight several On Course structures and strategies which have been effectively implemented as part of an entire course redesign prompted by a disconnect between the course objectives and the student achievement of those learning outcomes. The presenter will share his initial teaching experiences and the subsequent, student-centered classroom experiences to emphasize and articulate the efficacy of On Course principles.

    Session XX: Growth Mindset and Grit in Developmental Math Classes (RM, MS)
    Presenter: Bill Shamhart, Faculty, Mathematics, Glendale Community College, CA
    Summary: Come learn how growth mindset (GMS) and grit can be incorporated into any class. This interactive session will identify and contrast fixed versus growth mindsets. Numerous tools and activities which have been used in developmental math classes as well as in stand-alone workshops will be shared. Participation in learner-centered activities will demonstrate how you can facilitate GMS and grit with students in their classes and on campus. Teachers, counselors and administrators interested in improving student attitudes and facilitating growth mindset in your classes and on campus are invited to attend.

    Session XX: Creating Online Learner-Centered Activities (AE, TD)
    Presenters: Chris Strouthopoulos, Faculty, Student Success; Gregory Reynolds, Instructional Specialist, Health Information Technology, San Juan College, NM
    Summary: One central premise of On Course is that learner-centered activities work. Yet, why is it so difficult to create learner-centered activities online? How do we design online instruction that includes the active engagement and magic of the classroom experience? Inspired by these questions, we’ve started transforming our online courses into experiential environments that incorporate learner- centered activities. After briefly sharing our journey and insights, we’ll work in small groups brainstorming new ways for our online courses to engage students in transformational learning. Please bring your passion, your questions, and your favorite online activities/structures.

    Session XX: Rock’n College Wide Student Success (RF, PC)
    Presenters: Stephanie Atkins, Faculty Development Consultant; Melissa Wilke, English Instructor; Cynthia Kothbauer, Academic Advisor, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College
    Summary: Northeast Wisconsin Technical College noticed students were ‘runnin’ out of self-control, gettin’ close to an overload and many were up against a no-win situation. It was then that we knew something had to be done to help students “turn off the noise that was making them crazy.” The choice to embed On Course principles into the culture of the college strategically enhanced the college’s focus on student success. Sing with us as we Rock out the On Course principles, and participate in the analysis of how On Course and our student success course, College 101, have paved the way to increased course completion and persistence. Get a backstage pass to evaluate your own risk levels for implementation of new initiatives. With these initiatives, NWTC students now learn to “Be good to themselves” and take lessons from Journey to “Don’t Stop Believing.”

    Session XX: Resource Mapping: Addressing Students’ Barriers and Needs (RF, IN)
    Presenters: Kelsey Wiggins, Success Coach and Social Worker; Gabriela Olaguibel, Success Coach for First Generation Students, McLennan Community College, TX
    Summary: Students face a host of personal and academic challenges that adversely impact retention and success. In this session, we will address socio-economic, financial, physical, emotional, and academic barriers that college students face. Then we will discuss strategies for creating a shared resource map for campus personnel to support students in the efforts of addressing their various needs. We will share the model utilized at McLennan Community College for addressing an assortment of student barriers and the positive outcomes that have come from this system.

Breakout Sessions (90 minutes)

    Session XX: Introducing Culture in the Classroom: Gaining Self-Awareness (BA, RF, DS)
    Presenters: Romana Hughes, Assistant Provost; Desmond Morris, Director of Distance Learning, Texas Christian University
    Summary: In the Introduction to University Life class at Texas Christian University (TCU), one of the included topics is “Respecting Cultural Differences.” This topic is designed to be an introduction to TCU’s Core Values: Academic achievement, personal freedom and integrity, the dignity and respect of the individual, and a heritage of inclusiveness, tolerance, and service. As incoming freshmen, many of our students have not had a lot of exposure to self-awareness of culture. In this session we will share three strategies we have used with our students that have proven to be effective tools to provide students with the opportunity to gain self-awareness, engage, share, and learn about the various cultures in our small 15-student classroom. These strategies build inclusiveness, respect of individuals, and tolerance. Faculty and staff that work with students on the topic of culture, and who are interested in active and engaged learning, will want to attend this session.

    Session XX: Don’t Limit Your Challenges…Challenge Your Limits: Using MindTap for On Course to Help Students Overcome Obstacles (BA, TD, SL)
    Presenters: Essie Childers, Faculty, Education & Reading, Blinn College, TX; Sarah Seymour, Product Manager for College Success, Cengage Learning
    Summary: Digital tools, when designed and utilized from a learner-centered perspective, can help first-year students overcome many of the learning challenges they face in online, hybrid, and even face-to-face course environments. In this session, participants will explore MindTap, the online learning tool created specifically for the On Course text, and how it addresses specific student challenges such as poor reading abilities; ineffective self-assessment, self-reflection, or study skills; lack of digital confidence; poor time-management skills; and difficulty understanding real-world applications of the course content. This session will benefit any instructor who is ready to help students move beyond what they may perceive as their personal limits and discover the joy and power of lifelong learning.

    Session XX: Words, Words, Words: Everybody Can Teach Vocabulary (AE, RW)
    Presenter: Michelle Andersen Francis, Faculty, Reading and Chair of Professional Development, West Valley College, CA
    Summary: Research has empirically demonstrated that vocabulary is necessary and predictive for student success. However, vocabulary instruction is often arid and vapid. This session will demonstrate active learning strategies to help students learn a plethora of words. Participants will leave with an overview of the research on why vocabulary is important and will have a toolbox of strategies they can immediately use in their classrooms to teach vocabulary. Vocabulary can be fun!

    Session XX: Maximizing Quadrants and Potential: Active Learning Strategies for Time Management (AE, SL, GA)
    Presenter: Joselyn Gonzalez, Student Success Course Faculty/Coordinator, El Centro College, TX
    Summary: To use Stephen Covey’s Time Management quadrant system effectively in their lives, students must first thoroughly understand each quadrant and how their current personal and academic lives align with each one. Students struggle with understanding the difference between “urgent” and “important;” this is monumental not only to comprehending how the quadrant system works, but how to manage the activities within the quadrants. In this activity participants will progress through each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy as they first participate in a modified version of the jigsaw activity and then are asked to physically get in the quadrants and live! This session would benefit any individual who would like to incorporate or teach time management to students, but has been specifically used with FYE instructors and workshop facilitators, such as advisors.

    Session XX: The Brain that Does the Work (RM, BA, MS)
    Presenter: Deb Poese, Director, School of Education/Faculty, Mathematics, Montgomery College, MD
    Summary: Student success and degree completion are critical to our work in higher education. At the same time, there is no way to get around the fact that, as David Sousa says very simply in his book, How the Brain Learns, “The brain that does the work is the brain that learns.” How do we find the balance between challenging our students with the “brain work” necessary for learning and providing the support they need to complete the work and achieve success? Participants in this session will explore ways to motivate persistence and encourage personal responsibility for learning across a variety of disciplines, with an emphasis on mathematics and science.

    Session XX: Are You a HIP Instructor? Using High-Impact Practices to Foster A Learner-Centered Classroom (RM, AE, RW)
    Presenter: Ann Brandon, Faculty, Reading/On Course Instigator, Clovis Community College, CA
    Summary: Are your students used to passive learning? Do they sit back and let you, the instructor, do the work? Or, do you have a difficult time letting go of the reins in the classroom? A teacher-centered practice requires less work from students. Research indicates that the only way for our students to increase their learning is to actively engage in learning the content and skills we teach. In this session, you will experience high-impact practices (HIP) that promote meaningful active learning opportunities for your students. Let your students take the reins of their learning with a handful of engaging practices you will take back to your classroom.

    Session XX: Social Identity, Stereotypes, and Success: Is There a Link? (RM, BA, DS)
    Presenter: Eileen Zamora, Faculty Emerita, English & Learning Skills, Southwestern College, CA
    Summary: Gender, race, ethnicity, age, religion, and political affiliation are just a handful of ways in which each of us identifies ourselves. What makes these identities important or unimportant to us? What impact do our social identities have on our success, academically and otherwise? In this interactive session, you will determine the various social identities by which you and others may define yourselves, as well as analyzing some of the stereotypes associated with those identities. You will discover that how we define ourselves can create an obstacle to academic success of which many students and educators are unaware: stereotype threat. You will learn the conditions under which stereotype threat exists and its effect on academic performance based on research by Dr. Claude Steele and others. You will leave this session with proven strategies to minimize this threat to your students and yourself. This session is appropriate for all educators, counselors, and administrators. Handouts and links to online resources will be provided.

    Session XX: Chalk Talk: The Idea Exchange for Educators (AE, PC, GA)
    Presenters: Kaye Young, Coordinator, Student Learning Center, Jamestown Community College, NY; Robin Middleton, On Course Facilitator
    Summary: As faculty and staff in higher education, we are in a rewarding, yet challenging, profession that requires continuous growth to sharpen and strengthen our knowledge and skills. This session provides the perfect opportunity to share ideas and resources with other educators deeply committed to student success. Using the framework of a game board, ‘players’ wind their way through the halls of academe, encountering scenarios demanding effective problem-solving skills. Reflecting on your own experience as both student and educator, you will deepen your understanding of, and appreciation for, this amazing profession and the role you play in enhancing student success. Join us as we master the eight qualities of successful educators. (And yes, we’ll have fun too!)

    Session XX: Building Self-Esteem: My Best Self Portrait (BA, EQ, DS)
    Presenter: LuAnn Wood, Student Success Coordinator/Faculty, Reading, Century College, MN
    Summary: How we see ourselves, how our families and friends see us, and how the world sees us contribute directly to our level of self-esteem. In this session, we will explore several strategies that help students recognize their own strengths and victories. In addition, we will look at effective ways that faculty and student services can work to build students’ self-worth in a culturally responsive way.

    Session XX: Engaging Students in the Learning Process (PG, AE, PC)
    Presenter: Kaye Young, Coordinator, Student Learning Center, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: While many faculty have a desire to become more learner centered, it can be overwhelming finding effective strategies that will increase student engagement in the classroom. With the use of the JigSaw, participants will exchange a number of simple, easy to use strategies that can be implemented before, during, and after class, which invite greater student participation and involvement. Anyone involved with training, presentations, or workshops will also find these techniques valuable. Besides leaving with over 20 ideas for immediate implementation, each participant will have the opportunity to make a commitment to using one new strategy within the next 30 days.

    Session XX: Becoming Your Own Hero: Campbell’s Hero’s Journey as a Model for Successful Students (BA, RW, EQ)
    Presenter: Jim Kain, Faculty, English, Neumann University, PA
    Summary: How do teachers help their students have that change in perspective that allows them to see themselves as creators of their education? One way is to take advantage of our cultural store of films and tales and re-view them through the lens of Joseph Campbell’s model of The Hero’s Journey. Students have no problem recognizing the key features of the journey in many of the films and stories they’ve seen. But when asked to reflect, share, and reflect again on the significance and relevance of these concepts in their own lives, they often startle themselves with a new-found perspective, allowing them to see themselves in the role of hero in their own journeys. This workshop will take you through that process of becoming your own hero.

    Session XX: Student Behavior and Student Success: What’s the Missing Link? (RM, BA, RF)
    Presenter: Michelle Francis, Reading Professor/Professional Development Chair, West Valley College, CA
    Summary: Infusing the Eight On Course Principles in a college success class is seemingly easy, but it is more challenging to infuse them into a content area course. Participants in this session will engage in various strategies and activities that can be used in content area courses to increase student success and completion rates. Participants will also share their own strategies for how they have implemented the On Course Principles in their classrooms. At the completion of this highly interactive session, participants will leave with ideas to implement in their courses on Monday morning.

    Session XX: On Course in Every Class: Infusing the Eight Principles into the Content Areas (RM, AE, RW)
    Presenter: DeRhonda McWaine, Faculty/Student Success Coordinator, San Jacinto College North, TX
    Summary: Have you ever wondered why students behave in ways that hinder their success? Are students even aware of those behaviors that negatively affect their progress? As educators, we understand the link between student success and specific student behaviors. However, students are often unaware of those links. We can create opportunities for students to participate in success behaviors and reinforce those behaviors. In this session, the presenter will discuss the ICRE Method, explore specific success strategies, and examine research focused on student behaviors and success. At the conclusion of the session, participants will be equipped with activities and strategies that increase success behaviors. Instructors in any discipline, tutors, and retention specialists can benefit from these strategies.

    Session XX: Belief in Self: I Can Do This! (BA, RF, EQ)
    Presenter: Mark McBride, Communications/College Success, Eastern Florida State College
    Summary: Twenty years ago, Alfie Kohn wrote, “Of all the factors that determine how students will respond to failure, research has shown that the most important one of all is how they have come to explain that failure.” Many students arrive in our classes with psychological baggage that fills their minds with negative chatter. The bottom line for them? Success is hard to come by. In this session you will experience strategies that help students recognize destructive thoughts and replace them with positive, self-affirming ones. By session’s end, you’ll have tools to take back to your students and maybe even an extra shot of your very own I-can-do-this attitude.

    Session XX: A Learner-Centered Class from Day 1: Syllabus Station-to-Station (RM, MS, AE)
    Presenter: Al Trujillo, Faculty, Earth Sciences, Palomar College, CA
    Summary: Do you dread the stares of your students on the first day of class, when you go over the syllabus with them in painstaking detail, and they just sit there, looking at you expectantly (and perhaps trying to do some sneaky texting under their desks)? The first day of class sets the tone for the semester, and in this session you’ll experience a fun, active, On Course learning activity called station-to-station, which is a strategy that you can use not only to cover your syllabus, but also a wide variety of other course materials. Learn how to set the right tone for your class, starting on day one!

    Session XX: What’s in your Backpack? Helping Students Develop Self-Awareness and Self-Confidence (BA, EQ)
    Presenter: Robin Middleton, Faculty Emerita, Student Development, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: Students bring a great deal of emotional luggage with them when they arrive at college. Some are weighed down with past failures and negative academic experiences, making it challenging to stay motivated when encountering life’s inevitable obstacles. In this workshop participants will explore some of the “rocks” that weigh students down, and discover ways to help students fill their backpacks with the confidence and grit that will help them achieve their goals.

    Session XX: Raising the Bar: Take Your Course to the Next Level (RF, PC, AL)
    Presenter: DeRhonda McWaine, Faculty/Student Success Coordinator, San Jacinto College North, TX
    Summary: Are you ready to take your course to the next level? Are you ready to implement specific success initiatives and programs within your course to raise the bar for student achievement? Having an effective course is the first step; the second step is to enhance the effectiveness of your course by instituting programs that are directly related to an increase in student retention, completion rates, and fostering stronger connections. In this session, specific programs/initiatives (along with supporting data) will be provided to all participants. Participants will be given strategies on how to scale up (implement into an entire college wide program) or scale down (apply to a single course) the San Jacinto College success initiatives as well. At the conclusion of the session, participants will have the tools needed to implement all or parts of the initiatives within a course and explore and discuss the data that supports the initiative. All individuals who have an invested interest in the success of students within a given course would benefit from this session and they will receive practical information that can be implemented into any course.

    Session XX: When Students Feel They Matter: Building Community and Interdependence (PG, AE, RW)
    Presenter: LuAnn Wood, Student Success Coordinator/Faculty, Reading, Century College, MN
    Summary: As educators, we know the importance of building community for our students. When done well, we help students become more interdependent. As student populations in colleges become increasingly diverse, there is a greater urgency for educators to find ways to ensure all students feel a sense of belonging and connect with each other. The Noel-Levitz Survey of Student Engagement has shown that students are more successful in their classes if they feel connected to part of a larger community. The following activity will help educators foster a community of learners who are ready to value what others bring to class discussions and group projects. In this session participants will engage in the activity entitled, “Mattering and Marginalizing,” based on the work of Nancy K. Schlossberg. Her work on “Mattering,” the need to feel you belong and matter to another, is the basis for this student exercise. Walk away with directions and handouts to replicate this activity with students and colleagues on your campus.

    Session XX: Classroom Strategies to Grow Student Motivation (RM)
    Presenter: Mark McBride, Faculty, Communications/College Success, Eastern Florida State College
    Summary: A lack of student motivation has long been the bane of higher education. It not only disrupts student learning, it kills teacher enthusiasm. According to motivational experts Deci and Wlodkowski, we can’t motivate our students to do anything; however, we can influence them to find their own motivation. In this session, designed for teachers across the curriculum, we will explore why students lack motivation, examine research-based techniques that promote it, and share our own tools that spark student interest. In the end, participants will leave with ready-to-use strategies to help their students find their Inner Motivation.

    Session XX: Emotional Intelligence (EI) and College Success (RM, EQ)
    Presenter: Skip Downing, Author, On Course & Founder, On Course Workshop
    Summary: How many students will your college or university lose this year because they can’t manage their emotions? In this interactive session—a condensed version of the presenter’s full-day pre-conference workshop on Emotional Intelligence (EI)—we will focus on what EI is, why it is critical to student success and retention, and how to help students manage test anxiety.

    Session XX: Brain-Friendly Instruction: Enhancing Lifelong Learning (BA, AE, RW, DS)
    Presenter: Eileen Zamora, Faculty Emerita, English & Learning Skills, Southwestern College, CA
    Summary: Traditional methods of instruction can leave both students and instructors feeling that they have been swimming against the tide. Why? Current brain research has demonstrated that some traditional instructional methods are not in alignment with the way the brain learns best. Come and learn five principles for brain-friendly instruction and experience structures and strategies that will enable you to awaken and engage the brains in the classroom–both the students’ and yours!

    Session XX: What’s Self Esteem Got to Do With It? (RF, EQ)
    Presenter: Robin Middleton, Faculty Emerita, Student Development, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: For many educators, the issue of Self-Esteem seems an unlikely/unnecessary topic in a student success class, but research tells us that the two are deeply entwined. Low self-esteem is often expressed by poor attendance and participation, as well as procrastination and simply “giving up.” In this workshop we will explore factors related to self-esteem and experience strategies that address some of these factors to help students develop a realistic, healthy sense of self, allowing them to set achievable goals with the knowledge and confidence that they are competent enough to succeed. Participants will leave with at least three strategies for empowering students to believe in themselves.

    Session XX: Self Awareness and Learner Effectiveness (BA, RF, SL)
    Presenter: Jonathan Brennan, Faculty, English, Mission College, CA
    Summary: Students often face challenges in achieving their goals because they are unaware of how they can get in their own way. They can lack mindfulness, focus, and awareness of their strengths, liabilities and habitual patterns. Research on metacognition and academic learning reinforces the importance of students’ developing their capacity to be reflective and aware learners, understanding their own learning process, as well as their patterns of learning obstacles. Research on mindfulness practices indicate that they change how the brain responds to stress, strengthen connections in the prefrontal cortex and reduce reactivity in the limbic system, ultimately improving learning outcomes. This session is designed for educators teaching any discipline, and will present research, resources, and awareness strategies to bring back to the classroom or a student success program.

    Session XX: Study Smarter, Not Just Harder! (BA, PG, SL)
    Presenter: Amy Munson, Director of Instructional Design, United States Air Force Academy
    Summary: The United States Air Force Academy Science of Teaching and Learning program is conducting a study on how students learn about their own learning. The research team hypothesizes that students learn more from peers than from “outsiders” such as faculty members and has set out to develop a peer training and messaging program alongside a faculty training and messaging program using the same three highly successful learning/self-management strategies. On Course structures and strategies were implemented for the training components as researchers shared the benefits of practice testing, spaced practice and successive relearning as defined in Dunlosky and Rawson’s meta-analysis of learning strategies. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to learn more about those three strategies while also learning about how to implement a student “train the trainer” program.

    Session XX: Stimulating Active Learning in STEM Fields (RM, MS, AE, SL)
    Presenters: Cheryl Rock, Faculty, Food Science and Nutrition, California State University-Long Beach; Elizabeth Metzger, Faculty, English, University of South Florida
    Summary: An urgent need exists to produce undergraduates in science and other STEM fields. This session will provide an overview of active learning strategies and pedagogical activities to improve student learning/student retention, and assessment in science. Participants will engage in activities designed to appeal to and motivate students, such as collaboration, problem-solving, peer/self-assessment through rubrics, and games. This session will illustrate connections between academic life and course content, encouraging students to become life-long learners. While the session will interest STEM faculty, it will also benefit administrators, academic advisors, and program coordinators for student success and retention.

    Session XX: From Victim to Creator: Change Your Attitude—Transform your Life (RM, RF, PC)
    Presenter: Traci Robichaud-Holler, Faculty, Professional Development and Business Education, Cuesta College, CA
    Summary: Olympic Gold Medalist Scott Hamilton wrote, “The only disability in life is a bad attitude.” According to a Stanford University survey, 87.5 percent of a person’s success, performance, and their ability to overcome obstacles are based on attitude and 12.5 percent is centered on a person’s IQ. In this workshop we will explore how a negative attitude perpetuates a victim mindset and cripples a person’s success not only in the classroom but in life. We will identify–and immediately implement–specific strategies to tackle a negative attitude and empower students, family, and colleagues to improve their attitude and increase their success. Whether you are a seasoned professor, retention specialist, or a student success instructor you’ll be enriched by this workshop. How would you answer? “Attitudes are contagious—is yours worth catching?”

    Session XX: Facilitating the Facilitators: Strategies for Shifting the Instruction Paradigm (PC, SL)
    Presenters: Tammy Prater, Faculty, History; Vivian Grooms, Faculty, Psychology, Jackson State Community College, TN
    Summary: Establishing best practices for educators who are attempting to shift from a lecture style to a facilitator model is a process every higher education institution is likely to address. In this session, participants will engage in activities used at one community college as they navigated the changes from teacher as ultimate authority to teacher as model learner. By using a Socratic method where active learners can gain knowledge in an activity-driven model, all faculty, staff, and administrators can attain skills which model the behaviors of life-long learners. Participants will leave this session with concrete ideas and actions they can take back to their campuses to model this paradigm shift.

    Session XX: Introducing New Faculty to On Course Principles (RW, PC)
    Presenters: Tonya Greene, Faculty, Chair, Student Success; Cheryl Burk, Faculty, Student Success and Developmental Reading and Writing, Wake Technical Community College, NC
    Summary: Participate in the presentation that Wake Tech Community College uses to introduce new faculty to On Course learner-centered principles and strategies. Come and experience effective and proven ways to raise new faculty’s awareness of the need to both effectively profess one’s content area expertise and simultaneously create learning opportunities and environments that empower students to stay in college to achieve academic success. To fully appreciate the experience, session participants will actively engage as “new faculty.” This session will benefit anyone looking for inspiration to create their own new faculty professional development offering or use in a department meeting to engage and empower current faculty who are not yet familiar with On Course principles and strategies.

Poster Sessions

    Session XX:
    Presenter:
    Summary: How do we get students to self-evaluate and reflect on the eight inner qualities in a Developmental English course where retention is often a problem? The main objective of this session is to demonstrate lesson plans in which the writing prompts and grammar activities use the eight qualities of successful students. After attending On Course I, I redesigned my Developmental English course so that students could immerse themselves in not only the content of an English course, but also the On Course qualities. Participants will see the eight prompts and numerous grammar lesson plans that I have created to infuse a developmental writing course with On Course concepts. In addition, I will share exemplary student examples, as well as evidence from current and past students about their experiences writing these paragraphs.

2016 Program

(Thursday, April 7, 2016 Pre-conference Session descriptions, click here)

Breakout Sessions #2 (60 minutes) 10:00-11:00AM Friday

    Session 2A: An Introduction to On Course (MS, PC)
    Presenter: Deb Poese, Director, School of Education/Faculty, Mathematics, Montgomery College, MD
    Summary: New to On Course? Wondering what it’s all about? This session will provide an overview of the On Course approach to student success. Participants will learn 1) the success principles that are the foundation of On Course, 2) how On Course is different from most student success approaches, 3) data demonstrating the success of this method, and 4) On Course resources available to support your students’ academic success and retention.

    Session 2B: Everything is Extra Credit: Moving Beyond Required Assignments (RM, RF, SL)
    Presenter: Will Dressler, College Success Coordinator, Kauai Community College, HI
    Summary: What happens when you make (almost) everything in your course optional? Students feel empowered as they make choices to direct their own learning and learn to embrace a growth mindset as fear of failure becomes less of an obstacle. This session reviews some of the reasons why eliminating required assignments can lead to greater success, and explores different models that can be used by instructors of any discipline. A short informational presentation will precede an interactive time where participants will explore ways to redesign their own courses. Participants are encouraged to bring paper or electronic copies of their own syllabi.

    Session 2C: On Course Goes to High School: Choosing a Good Road (RF, HC)
    Presenter: Jonathan Brennan, Faculty, English, Mission College, CA
    Summary: How might we improve the excellent results from using On Course with college students? Introduce high school students to a basic set of success principles so that these students can practice life skills before they arrive at college. This session will explore developing college/career readiness in middle/high school students, the latest research on non-cognitive competencies, and how to develop a success pipeline that improves both high school and college retention, persistence and graduation. Educators from all disciplines are encouraged to attend, especially those that are interested in developing partnerships between high schools and colleges.

    Session 2D: Names = Community: Helping Students to Learn and Use Each Other’s Name to Build a Stronger Classroom (RF, PG, RW)
    Presenter: Mackenzie Krzmarzick, Faculty, Communication Studies, Anoka-Ramsey Community College, MN
    Summary: Knowing and using the names of those around us is an important interpersonal and professional skill to incorporate into our daily lives. It’s also a lesson that can help our students to strengthen their classroom environment. This session addresses several pedagogical approaches to helping students to learn each others’ names, use them to build a positive classroom environment, and apply this skill to their lives outside of the classroom. At the end of the session, participants will have a chance to reflect on their results from the session to choose the strategy that will most effectively suit their needs.

    Session 2E: Maximizing Quadrants and Potential: Active Learning Strategies for Time Management (AE, SL, GA)
    Presenter: Joselyn Gonzalez, Student Success Course Faculty/ Coordinator, El Centro College, TX
    Summary: To use Stephen Covey’s Time Management quadrant system effectively in their lives, students must first thoroughly understand each quadrant and how their current personal and academic lives align with each one. Students struggle with understanding the difference between “urgent” and “important;” this is monumental not only to comprehending how the quadrant system works, but how to manage the activities within the quadrants. In this activity participants will progress through each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy as they first participate in a modified version of the jigsaw activity and then are asked to physically get in the quadrants and live! This session would benefit any individual who would like to incorporate or teach time management to students, but has been specifically used with FYE instructors and workshop facilitators, such as advisors.

    Session 2F: “I Think I Can:” Transforming Fear and Doubt into Success (RM, BA, EQ)
    Presenters: Erin Craig, Assistant Director, Nursing; Natalie Bradley, Coordinator and Counselor of NASAP (Nursing Academic Success & Advancement Program), Solano Community College, CA
    Summary: Positive psychology and relaxation techniques are essential to student success, and our work targeting these areas is believed to be a strong factor in the significant increase in board exam pass rates and addressing retention rates in our Nursing program. By incorporating a combination of REBT (Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy) concepts, relaxation techniques and positive visualization we encourage the students’ reframing of otherwise daunting circumstances and help them to overcome barriers to success. In this session you will directly experience two exercises that lead to improved academic performance. Participants will also learn about other essential factors of positive psychology that will spark inspiration to share with their schools, students and classrooms.

    Session 2G: Evaluating Participation, Preparedness, and Professionalism: Putting Responsibility in the Students’ Hands (RM, BA, AE, RW)
    Presenter: Amanda Irvin, Faculty, English/Faculty Development, Texas Christian University, TX
    Summary: As we incorporate more On Course principles and student engagement strategies in our courses—and expect more engagement and personal responsibility from our students—we might need to re-think our evaluation of participation, preparedness, and professionalism. These elements can be tricky to assess: How do we measure of quality versus quantity? How can we really know if a student prepared for class? In this session, we’ll explore methods for putting this potentially tricky evaluation in the students’ hands using a daily self-assessment rubric. Students will think intentionally and reflectively about their own participation, preparedness, and professionalism on a daily basis, opening avenues for personal growth and academic development. As an added bonus, it’ll ease your grading load, too!

    Session 2H: Supporting Success Through Student-Generated Exams (RM, AE)
    Presenter: Kristy Nadler, Faculty/Student Success and Psychology, University of New Mexico, Los Alamos
    Summary: Students often cram for tests and then quickly forget much of the information afterward. Learn how to boost your students’ quality and quantity of processing, increase intrinsic motivation, and improve student’s test scores and information retention through student-generated exams. Session participants will receive lots of hands-on practice in creating student-generated exams as well as detailed information about how learning occurs. This session will also explore ideas for adapting this method to a wide range of classroom settings and subject areas.

    Session 2I: Using Technology in Today’s Classroom to Engage Students and Raise the Learning Bar! (AE, TD)
    Presenters: Markus Ahrens, St. Louis Community College- Meramec, MO; Cathy Scott, Navarro College, TX, Faculty
    Summary: Examine how today’s students are engaged with technology tools every day, using mobile devices to text, tweet, post on social media, download and use apps, take selfies, “Google” and become “LinkedIn.” See how student’s constant engagement with technology in their personal lives has migrated into the classroom as an important element of the learning experience. Discuss how 21st century educators need to thrive, not merely survive, when using technology in courses. Whether you teach face-to-face, online or in a blended format, learn ways to incorporate technology in courses, in order to improve engagement and raise the learning bar.

    Session 2J: Opening Doors to Excellence: Using Hope and Mindset Strategies in the Classroom (RM, BA, RF, PC)
    Presenters: Elise Sanchez, Opening Doors Probation Counselor; Amy Borghi, Guidance Instructor, Chaffey College, CA
    Summary: Chaffey College has incorporated hope and mindset strategies into the On Course curriculum. Come learn how hope and mindset can be integrated into ANY class! This interactive session will explore practical classroom applications that have been effective with probation students. These various tools and activities can be used to motivate students, set specific goals, and overcome obstacles. Counselors, educators, and teachers interested in fostering and improving student attitudes are encouraged to attend. Participants will leave with strategies to help students be more hopeful, engage in their learning, be successful in your class…and LIFE!

    Panel Session 2K: Increasing Collaboration and Participation in the Classroom Using Interactive Technologies (PG, AE, TD, AL) This session is Part 1 of a 2-Part session. See Session 3K.
    Presenter: Kelly Falcone, Faculty, Health & Kinesiology, Palomar College, CA
    Summary: “Bring Your Own Device,” or “BYOD,” is what you will be doing in this interactive active-learning workshop on using technology in the classroom. You will be building a blog, using web-based student response systems, and incorporating the collaborative power of Google Drive. You will leave this workshop with multiple tech tools for immediate use in the classroom along with a Personal Learning Network of fellow On Course Bloggers. This session is Part One of a 2-Part session. See Session 3K

Breakout Sessions #3 (60 minutes) 11:15AM-12:15PM Friday

    Session 3A: Leveraging Technology to Actively Engage Students in Online Courses (AE, TD)
    Presenter: Stephanie Smith Budhai, Faculty, Education, Neumann University, PA
    Summary: How can you engage students in online courses as you do in the traditional classroom? As more on-campus courses are moved to the online environment, professors have to find ways to actively engage their students, while keeping the learning student-centered, and enjoyable. This session focuses on how to leverage the wide availability of new, exciting, and emerging free learning technologies to teach online. Explore best practices for utilizing a wide range of ubiquitous technology tools to foster opportunities for students to immerse themselves in the learning experience, communicate with you and each other, and to present content.

    Session 3B: Don’t Be A Victim! Updating Your Scripts for Success (RM, RF, EQ)
    Presenters: Ke’shun Walker; Lauren Young, Faculty, Learning Framework (College Success), Eastfield College, TX
    Summary: Student retention is often adversely impacted by irrational beliefs regarding academic and personal capabilities. This workshop will focus on accepting personal responsibility in multiple life domains. We will explore Victim/Creator mindset, and practice rewriting life “scripts” by identifying self-defeating habit patterns and disputing irrational beliefs. Participants will examine tools for improving emotional, behavioral, and thought patterns to take control of life outcomes in the classroom and beyond, using exercises that can be effectively employed in an individual or classroom setting. Specialists focusing on student success, retention, and mentoring will benefit from this session.

    Session 3C: Don’t Limit Your Challenges…Challenge Your Limits: Using MindTap for On Course to Help Students Overcome Obstacles (BA, TD, SL)
    Presenters: Essie Childers, Faculty, Education & Reading, Blinn College, TX; Erica Messenger, Senior Marketing Manager for College Success, Cengage Learning
    Summary: Digital tools, when designed and utilized from a learner-centered perspective, can help first-year students overcome many of the learning challenges they face in online, hybrid, and even face-to-face course environments. In this session, participants will explore MindTap, the online learning tool created specifically for the On Course text, and how it addresses specific student challenges such as poor reading abilities; ineffective self-assessment, self-reflection, or study skills; lack of digital confidence; poor time-management skills; and difficulty understanding real-world applications of the course content. This session will benefit any instructor who is ready to help students move beyond what they may perceive as their personal limits and discover the joy and power of lifelong learning.

    Session 3D: Connections to Reflection (RM, BA, RF, SL)
    Presenters: Eva O’Brian and Tom Ledbetter, Faculty, College Success, Midlands Technical College, SC
    Summary: Looking for more ideas to enhance your first year experience course? In this session, two specific strategies will be shared which engage students to tailor, customize, or individualize their approach to learning while assuming personal responsibility, self-management, gaining self-awareness, and lifelong learning for academic success. Reflection is embedded in both tools to provide the opportunity for students to explore and examine their own attitudes and behaviors, recognize what works and what does not, and to use results to reinforce, modify, and adjust strategies. The presenters will describe academic benefits that have emerged, and offer practical applications for grading and developing enrichment activities which have also been used with their students.

    Session 3E: Words, Words, Words: Everybody Can Teach Vocabulary (AE, RW)
    Presenter: Michelle Andersen Francis, Faculty, Reading and Chair of Professional Development, West Valley College, CA
    Summary: Research has empirically demonstrated that vocabulary is necessary and predictive for student success. However, vocabulary instruction is often arid and vapid. This session will demonstrate active learning strategies to help students learn a plethora of words. Participants will leave with an overview of the research on why vocabulary is important and will have a toolbox of strategies they can immediately use in their classrooms to teach vocabulary. Vocabulary can be fun!

    Session 3F: Using A Case Study During New Student Days (RF, PG, AE, PC)
    Presenters: Amy Munson, Director of Instructional Design, United States Air Force Academy
    Summary: In this session we will look at how On Course has informed Heartland Community College’s New Student Days. New students attend a Student Success workshop in which they participate in several activities that will help them be successful at Heartland. This session will focus on the case study activity that we use to help students identify their own barriers to success and how they can plan to overcome them. This session will be most beneficial to orientation or FYE educators, but will benefit anyone who wants to see how a case study can be used outside of the classroom.

    Session 3G: Integrating On Course into Peer Tutor Training (PG, PC)
    Presenters: Mary Beth Willett, Assistant Director/Tutor Program; Jessica Bishop, Academic Resource Specialist TRIO, University of Maine
    Summary: Do you coordinate tutoring at your institution? Have you integrated On Course activities to help the tutors understand their role and more effectively prepare for tutoring sessions? Attend this session to learn how the University of Maine Tutor Program administrators have integrated the On Course principles to help tutors stay “on course” in their role of helping students meet their academic goals. Experience these activities first-hand and learn how to implement at your own institution.

    Session 3H: Motivational Interviewing: Conversations That Inspire Students to Let Their Creator Mindset Shine (RM, RW)
    Presenters: Richard Rutschman, Professional Development Facilitator; Jesse Rutschman, TRIO Student Support Services Coordinator, Northeastern Illinois University
    Summary: Regardless of your role, knowing how to help students become more intrinsically motivated is key and it involves what TO do as well as what NOT to do. Motivational interviewing, a high impact evidence-based practice which originated as a therapeutic approach for helping people with addictions decide to go into treatment, provides an approach which is also useful in educational settings. By gaining the tools of motivational interviewing you will help students follow through with On Course strategies in a way that will help them to reach their goals and address issues that interfere. Instead of pushing students to change, you will have an effective tool that will lead to students who feel empowered and more positive about their ability to do what it takes.

    Panel Session 3I: Flipping the Model: Appreciative Advisors Accepting Personal Responsibility (RM, RF, SL)
    Presenters: Chelsey Vest; Charlene Stephens, Department of Student Success & Retention; Danielle Archambault; Christine McDermott, Department of Academic Support, Wesley College, DE
    Summary: This presentation outlines the integration of the Appreciative Advising model (AAM) into AS198, a first year transitional college course that was created using On Course principles. Participants will get the opportunity to put themselves in the shoes of students through creative and affective exercises while exploring the Appreciative Advising framework and its impact on student experience and development. While AS198 aims to develop student self-management, the AAM offers advisors, instructors, and invested staff members alike an opportunity to thoughtfully and intentionally develop an intrinsic method for guiding students as they gain mastery of On Course principles. Our retention data supports the effectiveness of integrating AAM as a means of increasing advisor self-awareness with the goal of positively impacting student growth and development.

    Session 3J: Learning with Legos® – Using Simple Objects to Teach Abstract Concepts (MS, GA)
    Presenters: Elizabeth Jennison, Faculty, Accounting; Paula Koch, Faculty, Accounting, El Camino College, CA
    Summary: Ever give a lecture and see a sea of blank faces at the end? Students often struggle to understand concepts because they come from an unfamiliar context. As a result, the concepts go right over their heads. We can provide that context by using simple objects such as blocks or candy to simulate real situations. In this session, you will simulate a manufacturing process using Legos®, learn a little business and accounting, and develop creative ideas to teach abstract concepts in your classroom. Simulations with objects are probably most appropriate for business, economics, and STEM disciplines, but can be used in any discipline to make abstract concepts more concrete.

    Session 3K: Increasing Collaboration and Participation in the Classroom Using Interactive Technologies (PG, AE, TD, AL) This session is Part 2 of a 2-Part session. See Session 2K.
    Presenter: Kelly Falcone, Faculty, Health & Kinesiology, Palomar College, CA
    Summary: “Bring Your Own Device,” or “BYOD,” is what you will be doing in this interactive active-learning workshop on using technology in the classroom. You will be building a blog, using web-based student response systems, and incorporating the collaborative power of Google Drive. You will leave this workshop with multiple tech tools for immediate use in the classroom along with a Personal Learning Network of fellow On Course Bloggers.

Breakout Sessions #4 (75 minutes) 1:30-2:45PM Friday

    Session 4A: Weekend College: New Pathways for Working Students (RF, AL)
    Presenters: Kathryn Hernandez, Weekend College Faculty Coordinator/ Lead Math Instructor; Summer Sanderson, Weekend College Lead English Instructor; John Elliott, Weekend College Lead Welding Instructor; Santiago Guardiola, Weekend College Lead Computer Instructor; Jessica Falla, Weekend College Completion Coach, Lee College, TX
    Summary: Lee College is one of four community colleges in the U.S. to receive the First in the World Grant, and is using it to improve graduation rates: on average, 14.5% of full-time students graduate within three years, 31.1% within six years, but only 7.9% of part-time students graduate in three years and 24.4% within six years. Lee College has created a Weekend College program offering 5 different degree tracks to busy students who take courses on Friday nights and Saturdays. With specialized course scheduling, fast track hybrid courses (with Learning Community environments), and 24/7 tutoring across subjects, the students are expected to graduate faster than the average student and at a higher completion rate. A cohort-based model allows students to develop great relationships with each other and gain support from one another. Attendees of our session will get to hear the ups and downs of creating such a program, gaining insight into how the fast track hybrid courses have worked so far, and which incentives have been the most successful.

    Session 4B: Lessons from a Basement Studio: How to Make a Riveting Online Class (MS, TD, AL)
    Presenter: Barb Oakley, Faculty, Engineering, Oakland University, MI; Visiting Scholar, University of California, San Diego
    Summary: Come and hear about the creation of Learning How to Learn, one of Coursera’s most popular MOOCs, with well over a million students from over 200 countries in the first eighteen months alone. Despite its immense global reach and popularity, Learning How to Learn was put together for less than $5,000 dollars in an amateur basement studio. Discuss the key elements behind the making of high quality educational videos for online learning, including many issues that are often overlooked by educators. The easy-to-grasp and inexpensive techniques described in this talk are available to all course developers who are looking to create high quality online experiences for students.

    Session 4C: Failure isn’t Fatal (BA, MS, SL))
    Presenter: Deb Poese, Director, School of Education/Faculty, Mathematics, Montgomery College, MD
    Summary: As faculty and student service professionals, we often see students discouraged by their mistakes and perhaps even stymied by a fear of failure. Are we contributing to those reactions, or are we helping students learn from the “University of Life” as they move through their college classes and experiences? In this session, participants will look at the issues of assessment, feedback, and lifelong learning through participating in classroom strategies and reflecting on their own practices. Come and consider how to help students (and others) come to understand: “The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing.” (Henry Ford)

    Session 4D: Are You A HIP Instructor? Using High Impact Practices to Foster A Learner Centered Classroom (RM, AE, RW)
    Presenter: Ann Brandon, Reading Instructor / On Course Instigator, Clovis Community College
    Summary: Are your students used to passive learning? Do they sit back and let you, the instructor, do the work? Or, do you have a difficult time letting go of the reins in the classroom? A teacher-centered practice requires less work from students. Research indicates that the only way for our students to increase their learning is to actively engage in learning the content and skills we teach. In this session, you will experience high impact practices (HIP) that promote meaningful active learning opportunities for your students. Let your students take the reins of their learning with a handful of engaging and meaningful high impact practices you will take back to your classroom.

    Session 4E: Social Identity, Stereotypes, and Success: Is There a Link? (RM, BA, DS)
    Presenter: Eileen Zamora, Faculty Emerita, English & Learning Skills, Southwestern College, CA
    Summary: Gender, race, ethnicity, age, religion, and political affiliation are just a handful of ways in which each of us identifies ourselves. What makes these identities important or unimportant to us? What impact do our social identities have on our success, academically and otherwise? In this interactive session, you will determine the various social identities by which you and others may define yourselves, as well as analyzing some of the stereotypes associated with those identities. You will discover how we define ourselves can create an obstacle to academic success of which many students and educators are unaware: stereotype threat. You will learn the conditions under which stereotype threat exists and its effect on academic performance based on research by Dr. Claude Steele and others. You will leave this session with proven strategies to minimize this threat to your students and yourself. This session is appropriate for all educators, counselors, and administrators. Handouts and links to online resources will be provided.

    Session 4F: Mindfulness in Motion: Reducing Student Anxiety and Stress Through Contemplative Practice (BA, EQ)
    Presenter: Zachary Ginder, Student Success Instructor & Counselor, Copper Mountain College, CA
    Summary: Have you ever encountered an exceptional student who performs less than optimally when it comes to testing or final assignments? Students frequently report heightened levels of anxiety and stress when faced with academic challenges in the classroom. Recent neurological research has shown that incorporating a contemplative practice, specifically mindfulness, into an individual’s daily routine can reduce stress, anxiety, and confusion while boosting immune function. In this interactive workshop participants will take part in multiple mindfulness and progressive relaxation exercises and discuss how to incorporate these practical applications within the classroom setting.

    Session 4G: Chalk Talk: the Idea Exchange for Educators (AE, PC, GA)
    Presenters: Kaye Young, Coordinator, Student Learning Center, Jamestown Community College, NY; Robin Middleton, On Course Facilitator
    Summary: As faculty and staff in higher education, we are in a rewarding, yet challenging, profession that requires continuous growth to sharpen and strengthen our knowledge and skills. This session provides the perfect opportunity to share ideas and resources with other educators deeply committed to student success. Using the framework of a game board, ‘players’ wind their way through the halls of academe, encountering scenarios demanding effective problem solving skills. Reflecting on your own experience as both student and educator, you will deepen your understanding of, and appreciation for, this amazing profession and the role you play in enhancing student success. Join us as we master the eight qualities of successful educators. (And yes, we’ll have fun too!)

    CANCELLED Session 4H: Getting to the Heart of the Matter: How Affective Teaching Practices Can Reach Even the Most Reluctant Students (PG, RW, GA)
    Presenters: Pam Gingold and Jane Wilson, Faculty, Writing, University of California, Merced
    Summary: Underprepared college students are often reluctant learners, especially in the process of writing. They fear criticism from teachers and judgment from their classmates. In order to build community and establish a comfortable learning environment, teachers need to be able to step down from being the source of “power” in the classroom and share that power with students. This session will offer ways in which to share personal childhood stories that cut right to the heart of how each of us learns. Participants will have some fun, play games, share stories, and create a group poster. Takeaway will be ideas for writing assignments and group presentations in the classroom. This session will be meaningful for writing teachers or anyone wanting to connect at a personal level with students.

    Session 4I: Gallery Walk: Inquiry Based Learning (PG, AE)
    Presenter: Mediha Din, Faculty, Sociology, El Camino College, CA
    Summary: The gallery walk activity uses the power of images to promote student curiosity, encourage collaboration, and draw on students’ prior knowledge. This session provides ideas for instructors looking to increase student engagement in content that may be historical or knowledge-based in nature. The gallery walk activity can be used for subjects within the Social Sciences, English, Art, Science and Technology, and can also be adapted to be beneficial in other courses. The in-class activity uses images, inquiry, movement in the classroom, and peer interaction to build student interest in content and increase retention of knowledge. Participants in this session will learn how to adapt the gallery walk to their courses and content.

    Session 4J: Winning the Scavenger Hunt of Discussions (PG, AE)
    Presenter: GwenEllyn Anderson, Faculty, Psychology, Chemeketa Community College, OR
    Summary: Students are often left to discuss a topic without the proper tools to complete a good discussion. This leads to simplistic responses that then deteriorate into chatting about other topics of personal interest rather than the topic “on the table.” In this session, participants will learn a scavenger hunt approach that teaches students how to find, focus on and facilitate key points in a discussion. Group discussions will be more engaging and get more effective results with these simple, easy-to-implement guidelines. Participants will have a chance to practice implementing this approach to fine-tune it for their discipline. Any educator or facilitator that uses discussions or wants to use discussions to further provoke thinking will benefit from attending this session.

    Session 4K: Building Self-Esteem: My Best Self Portrait (BA, EQ, DS)
    Presenter: LuAnn Wood, Student Success Coordinator/Faculty, Reading, Century College, MN
    Summary: How we see ourselves, how our families and friends see us, and how the world sees us contribute directly to our level of self-esteem. In this session, we will explore several strategies that help students recognize their own strengths and victories. In addition, we will look at effective ways that faculty and student services can work to build student’s self-worth in a culturally responsive way.

Breakout Sessions #5 (75 minutes) 3:15-4:30PM Friday

    Session 5A: Xtreme Innovations & Learning Communities (MS, RF, PG, RW, AL)
    Presenters: Amy Klohn, Quality Enhancement Coordinator; Mary Martinson, Dean of Student Success; Dr. Rochelle Gregory, Honors Coordinator and English Faculty, North Central Texas College; Lisa Gillis-Davis, Counselor, FYE, Windward Community College, HI
    Summary: Three core courses at North Central Texas College produced the greatest number of students receiving a “D, F or W:” US History 1301, Composition I, and College Algebra. To better serve students, gateway courses were renovated and re-designed as part of the “Project Xtreme” initiative to include key contextual academic behaviors and skills. These renovated courses facilitate students’ integration and application of college readiness and study skills by embedding academic contextual skills and structured academic support activities into course curriculum. Students in these sections of Xtreme courses are also required to participate in structured academic support activities such as in-depth academic advising, tutoring/supplemental instruction, time management activities, and library resource activities. This presentation will address the “construction” and implementation of these elements, data and program structure, and share the challenges for implementing these initiatives as observed by the “building crew” during the project. The Windward Community College learning communities have been proven to increase GPA, completion and retention. The campus data supports these findings and they have developed innovative six-credit collaborations using On Course with second academic subjects including: Cultural Anthropology, Polynesian Voyaging, Acting, Art, and Speech. They will provide highlights of the most innovative pairings, and sample course projects including a student-led ethnographic study of the campus, a debate about various world civilizations, a self-reflective art activity, and an interactive live-character semester-long campus-wide game simulation.

    Session 5B: Engaging Students in the Learning Process (PG, AE, PC)
    Presenter: Kaye Young, Coordinator, Student Learning Center, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: While many faculty have a desire to become more learner centered, it can be overwhelming finding effective strategies that will increase student engagement in the classroom. With the use of the Jig Saw, participants will exchange a number of simple, easy to use strategies that can be implemented before, during, and after class, which invite greater student participation and involvement. Anyone involved with training, presentations, or workshops will also find these techniques valuable. Besides leaving with over 20 ideas for immediate implementation, each participant will have the opportunity to make a commitment to using one new strategy within the next 30 days.

    Session 5C: A Cooperative Learning Group Exam Using the IF-AT Assessment Tool (MS, PG)
    Presenter: Al Trujillo, Faculty, Earth Sciences, Palomar College, CA
    Summary: Have you ever considered giving an exam where students work together in groups to answer questions? If so, you have probably struggled with questions such as “How do I make the exam fair to every student in a group?” “How do I get all students to participate?” and “How do I grade such an exam?” One way to address these issues is to use the Instructional Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT). In this session, you will work in a group to take a sample trivia exam using the IF-AT assessment tool. A group discussion will follow that will focus on instructor experience with giving a group exam, student comments, and how this assessment technique can be used in a wide variety of disciplines and curriculum styles. This workshop is a must for instructors seeking an effective group assessment technique.

    Session 5D: Introducing Culture in the Classroom: Gaining Self-Awareness (BA, RF, DS)
    Presenters: Romana Hughes, Assistant Provost; Desmond Morris, Director of Distance Learning; Texas Christian University
    Summary: In the Introduction to University Life class at Texas Christian University (TCU), one of the included topics is “Respecting Cultural Differences.” This topic is designed to be an introduction to TCU’s Core Values: Academic achievement, personal freedom and integrity, the dignity and respect of the individual, and a heritage of inclusiveness, tolerance, and service. As incoming freshman, many of our students have not had a lot of exposure to self-awareness of culture. In this session we will share three strategies we have used with our students that have proven to be effective tools to provide students with the opportunity to gain self-awareness, engage, share, and learn about the various cultures in our small 15- student classroom. These strategies build inclusiveness, respect of individuals, and tolerance. Faculty and staff that work with students on the topic of culture and who are interested in active and engaged learning will want to attend this session.

    Session 5E: Becoming Your Own Hero: Campbell’s Hero’s Journey as a Model for Successful Students (BA, RW, EQ)
    Presenter: Jim Kain, Faculty, English, Neumann University, PA
    Summary: How do teachers help their students have that change in perspective that allows them to see themselves as creators of their education? One way is to take advantage of our cultural store of films and tales and re-view them through the lens of Joseph Campbell’s model of The Hero’s Journey. Students have no problem recognizing the key features of the journey in many of the films and stories they’ve seen. But when asked to reflect, share, and reflect again on the significance and relevance of these concepts in their own lives, they often startle themselves with a new-found perspective allowing them to see themselves in the role of hero in their own journeys. This workshop will take you through that process of becoming your own hero.

    Session 5F: On Course in Every Class: Infusing the Eight Principles into the Content Areas (RM, AE, RW)
    Presenter: Michelle Francis, Reading Professor/ Professional Development Chair, West Valley College, CA
    Summary: Infusing the Eight On Course Principles in a college success class is seemingly easy, but it is more challenging to infuse them into a content area course. Participants in this session will engage in various strategies and activities that can be used in content area courses to increase student success and completion rates. Participants will also share their own strategies for how they have implemented the On Course Principles in their classrooms. At the completion of this highly interactive session, participants will leave with ideas to implement in their courses on Monday morning.

    Session 5G: Encouraging Interdependence in the Online Classroom (PG, AE, TD)
    Presenter: Teresa Ward, Faculty, Language Education and Development, Butte College, CA
    Summary: Students need to learn to work effectively with others in order to succeed in the online learning environment. In this workshop, participants will explore several collaborative learning structures and activities that help students make connections with one another, as well as with course content in online classes. Attendees will have the opportunity to experience and analyze learner-centered activities which are easily adaptable to promote interdependence among online students. They will return to their campuses with a selection of strategies that can be used immediately.

    Session 5H: Student Behavior and Student Success: What’s the Missing Link? (RM, BA, RF)
    Presenter: DeRhonda McWaine, Faculty/Student Success Coordinator, San Jacinto College North, TX
    Summary: Have you ever wondered why students behave in ways that hinder their success? Are students even aware of those behaviors that negatively affect their progress? As educators, we understand the link between student success and specific student behaviors. However, students are often unaware of those links. We can create opportunities for students to participate in success behaviors and reinforce those behaviors. In this session, the presenter will discuss the ICRE Method, explore specific success strategies, and examine research focused on student behaviors and success. At the conclusion of the session, participants will be equipped with activities and strategies that increase success behaviors. Instructors in any discipline, tutors, and retention specialists can benefit from these strategies.

    Session 5I: Belief in Self: I Can Do This! (BA, RF, EQ)
    Presenter: Mark McBride, Communications/College Success, Eastern Florida State College, FL
    Summary: Twenty years ago, Alfie Kohn wrote, “Of all the factors that determine how students will respond to failure, research has shown that the most important one of all is how they have come to explain that failure.” Many students arrive in our classes with psychological baggage that fills their minds with negative chatter. The bottom line for them? Success is hard to come by. In this session you will experience strategies that help students recognize destructive thoughts and replace them with positive, self-affirming ones. By session’s end, you’ll have tools to take back to your students and maybe even an extra shot of your very own I-can-do this attitude.

    Session 5J: Scarcity, Bandwidth and The Slight Edge (RM, BA)
    Presenter: Pat Vos, CEO, Intercon Messaging Inc., Alberta, CA
    Summary: Help your students achieve even more success by giving them the opportunity to reflect and determine what keeps them in a life of scarcity, lacking bandwidth. We do not always know what is holding us back. By learning the concept of The Slight Edge, help your students learn how to apply a Slight Edge strategy they are willing to implement to move consistently and incrementally toward the life of their dreams. (Sometimes people arrive in our lives pretty beaten up and we need to first teach them to dream again.) As they learn to increase their bandwidth and apply a slight edge strategy consistently, they will slowly shift from a life of scarcity to a life of abundance.

    Session 5K: Finding Your Why To A Meaningful Life (BA, RF)
    Presenter: William H. Johnson Jr., Student Success Coordinator/Personal Development Coach, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
    Summary: Faculty complain that students aren’t motivated in the classroom; students feel lost because most aren’t sure what they want to do in life. Research studies and self-help books document the importance of knowing one’s purpose. People want to connect with something meaningful – from 8 to 80 – and it all starts with purpose! This session will provide you with the tools to begin the purpose-exploration process. You will be actively engaged in this process, answering questions and creating statements focused on your mission, your vision, and how you want to live your life every day. You will be challenged – in a positive way – to reflect on your life, now and for the future. You will also be encouraged to help your fellow participants construct their statements. By the end of the session, you will leave with: (1) a mission statement, describing how you want to serve others, (2) a life motto, describing how you want to live your life every day, and (3) a vision statement, providing a direction for your life in the future. You will also be able to use the tools in the workshops with the populations you work with on a daily basis. At UNCG, the presenter uses the “Find Your Why” process in his life success course; he has also been asked to present this work in a number of courses around campus, from first-year seminars to senior level capstone courses. This program is now an integral part of the “Educating from the Heart: Creating Meaningful Educational Experiences” faculty/staff retreat program for campuses across the country.

Poster Sessions (60 minutes) 4:30-5:30PM Friday

    Poster Session 1: Compressed Calendar and Developmental Math (RM, MS, AL)
    Presenter: Biju Raman, Faculty, Developmental Math, Palo Verde College, CA
    Summary: Palo Verde College has struggled with retention, success and persistence in Developmental Math, especially in those courses three to four levels below the credit transfer course. By adopting a compressed calendar we have been able to demonstrate considerable improvement in course results. Calendar design and outcomes from the project will be presented.

    Poster Session 2: Using Research-Based Technology to Enhance Student-Centered Learning in Science (RM, MS, SL)
    Presenter: Anna Lou, Student Researcher, Chemistry, Oxford Academy, CA
    Summary: Students often find chemistry difficult and frustrating. This poster session will demonstrate how research-based technology enhances guided student-centered learning in chemistry. The innovative web-based instructional tool was developed by combining expertise from educational research, chemistry, and computer programming. This tool applies the cognitive load theories and embeds numerous checkpoints for individualized, research-informed guidance. The tool has been used by hundreds of college students and has significantly increased students’ knowledge gains, interest, and motivation compared to traditional teaching. This work has received numerous awards in Innovation in Education from regional and national education nonprofit organizations.

    Poster Session 3: College Game Day: Using Student Created Games to Facilitate Engagement (AE, GA)
    Presenter: Jennifer Sarabok, Faculty, Psychology and Sociology, Butler County Community College, PA
    Summary: Can a final project engage students with your course material at a high level? Can that same final project help students to make friends, have fun, and reduce stress? The answer is YES! The main objective of this poster session is to describe the use of student created games as a capstone project to facilitate high levels of processing while creating an opportunity for student engagement in the learning process. Participants will learn the specifics of a “best practice” in which students, in self-selected groups, create an original content-driven game for their classmates to play in a carnival-like setting on “Game Day.” Student testimonials, photographs, and video interviews will be included. In addition, a few past student games will be available for participants to play.

    CANCELLED Poster Session 4: Action Boards: Exploring Goals, Overcoming Obstacles and Creating a Culture of Success (RM, RW)
    Presenter: Shaunda Durham, JoAnn Credle, Faculty, Communication, Northern Virginia Community College, VA
    Summary: If you are looking for strategies to get your students engaged with connecting theory to career opportunities, then this poster session is for you. Learn how to increase students’ awareness of how communication skills impact their marketability in today’s workforce. From your classroom course to careers, making the connection of how communication counts in the “big picture” for students and their success. This classroom-tested activity is based on interpersonal skills of listening, non-verbal communication and effective use of visual aids to support a message in a career fair setting. Career resources staff, student success instructors, retention specialists, and instructors in all disciplines will benefit from identifying new ways to integrate career resources within college course content. Learn best practices for increasing awareness of effective communication skills needed for career and workforce development.

    CANCELLED Poster Session 5: Fostering an Understanding of Human Experience Using Immersion, Observation and Experience Mapping: A Marketing Example (BA, AE)
    Presenter: Elaine Notarantonio, Faculty, Marketing, Bryant University, RI
    Summary: This poster session describes an active learning approach to understanding humans in their natural environment, using consumers in the marketplace as an example. Drawing from ethnographic research, where the goal is to reveal reality from the consumer’s or user’s perspective, the approach offers a unique opportunity to generate strategic insights. It is achieved through a mix of doing, asking and observing.

Breakout Sessions #6 (75 minutes) 8:15-9:30AM Saturday

    Session 6A: Retention & Diverse Populations (RF, DS)
    Presenters: Bob VanSchyndel, Native American Student Support Specialist; Gema Garcia, Hispanic Student Support Specialist, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College; Al-Lateef Farmer, EOF Student Development Specialist; John Smith/EOF Counselor, Mercer County Community College, NJ
    Summary: In an attempt to increase retention and completion of diverse populations, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College’s Student Support Services has developed a case management system that includes the 4 Disciplines of Excellence (Franklin/Covey). This system has allowed increased engagement of diverse populations and creative action in the work to reduce the achievement gap. It can be used a model or as an inspiration for other organizations to change their data focus to be more real-time. Instructors and student services workers alike will benefit from a deeper understanding of the importance for real-time data and a logical case management structure to intervene and engage students. Mercer County Community College has developed a Summer Academy to address academic persistence, particularly among minority males. Students are clustered according to their Basic English and Mathematics skill level in an effort to prepare them for college-level studies. Additionally, workshops geared toward comprehensive student development and widening the scope of their worldview and self-efficacy were implemented. Educators will share best practices and strategies to assist attendees in the development of programs that serve first-generation, low-income students, intending to improve retention and graduation rates, and exploring the institutional, social and systemic barriers that may impede the success of these students.

    Session 6B: A Learner-Centered Class from Day 1: Syllabus Station-to-Station (RM, MS, AE)
    Presenter: Al Trujillo, Faculty, Earth Sciences, Palomar College, CA
    Summary: Do you dread the stares of your students on the first day of class, when you go over the syllabus with them in painstaking detail, and they just sit there, looking at you expectantly (and perhaps trying to do some sneaky texting under their desks)? The first day of class sets the tone for the semester, and in this session you’ll experience a fun, active, On Course learning activity called station-to-station, which is a strategy that you can use not only to cover your syllabus, but also a wide variety of other course materials. Learn how to set the right tone for your class, starting on day one!

    Panel Session 6C: Peer Instruction in the College Classroom: How to Get Students Involved in Learning and Understanding Concepts (MS, PG, AE)
    Presenter: Holly McKnight, Faculty, Science Education, Eastern Florida State College
    Summary: Have you ever been astonished to learn that, despite your best efforts, students did not grasp fundamental concepts covered in class? Peer Instruction (PI) is a student-centered pedagogy that encourages interactive engagement by modifying traditional lecture format to include questions that engage students and uncover their level of understanding. This is done by interspersing lecture with conceptual questions. The basic premise of PI is that students need the opportunity to discuss concepts with their peers. In addition, instructors need timely feedback on what their students understand. In this hands-on workshop, we will explore the possibilities of PI and how can incorporate it into your classroom.

    Session 6D: Animate Your Bilingual Students (RW, TD, DS)
    Presenter: Sharyn Obsatz, Faculty, Journalism and Media Studies, Santa Monica College and Glendale Community College, CA
    Summary: Students who are English-language learners can sometimes be reticent in class discussions. In this session, the presenter will describe how she modified the On-Course small-group animated video project to energize her bilingual students and build on their strengths by grouping students of different backgrounds and guiding them to make bilingual videos of concepts or theories covered in class. This active-learning session will walk you through the project steps so you can apply it with your classes immediately.

    Session 6E: What’s in your Backpack? Helping Students Develop Self-Awareness and Self-Confidence (BA, EQ)
    Presenter: Robin Middleton, Faculty, Student Development, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: Students bring a great deal of emotional luggage with them when they arrive at college. Some are weighed down with past failures and negative academic experiences, making it challenging to stay motivated when encountering life’s inevitable obstacles. In this workshop participants will explore some of the ‘rocks’ that weigh students down, and discover ways to help students fill their backpacks with the confidence and grit that will help them achieve their goals.

    Session 6F: Raising the Bar: Take Your Course to the Next Level (RF, PC, AL)
    Presenter: DeRhonda McWaine, Faculty/Student Success Coordinator, San Jacinto College North, TX
    Summary: Are you ready to take your course to the next level? Are you ready to implement specific success initiatives and programs within your course to raise the bar for student achievement? Having an effective course is the first step; the second step is to enhance the effectiveness of your course by instituting programs that are directly related to an increase in student retention, completion rates, and fostering stronger connections. In this session, specific programs/initiatives (along with supporting data) will be provided to all participants. Participants will be given strategies on how to scale up (implement into an entire college wide program) or scale down (apply to a single course) the San Jacinto College success initiatives as well. At the conclusion of the session, participants will have the tools needed to implement all or parts of the initiatives within a course and explore and discuss the data that supports the initiative. All individuals who have an invested interest in the success of students within a given course would benefit from this session and they will receive practical information that can be implemented into any course.

    Session 6G: When Students Feel They Matter: Building Community and Interdependence (PG, AE, RW)
    Presenter: LuAnn Wood, Student Success Coordinator/Faculty, Reading, Century College, MN
    Summary: As educators, we know the importance of building community for our students. When done well, we help students become more interdependent. As student populations in colleges become increasingly diverse, there is a greater urgency for educators to find ways to ensure all students feel a sense of belonging and connect with each other. The Noel-Levitz Survey of Student Engagement has shown that students are more successful in their classes if they feel connected to part of a larger community. The following activity will help educators foster a community of learners who are ready to value what others bring to class discussions and group projects. In this session participants will engage in the activity entitled, “Mattering and Marginalizing,” based on the work of Nancy K. Schlossberg. Her work on “Mattering,” the need to feel you belong and matter to another, is the basis for this student exercise. Walk away with directions and handouts to replicate this activity with students and colleagues on your campus.

    Session 6H: Classroom Strategies to Grow Student Motivation (RM)
    Presenter: Mark McBride, Faculty, Communications/College Success, Eastern Florida State College
    Summary: A lack of student motivation has long been the bane of higher education. It not only disrupts student learning, it kills teacher enthusiasm. According to motivational experts Deci and Wlodkowski, we can’t motivate our students to do anything; however, we can influence them to find their own motivation. In this session, designed for teachers across the curriculum, we will explore why students lack motivation, examine research-based techniques that promote it, and share our own tools that spark student interest. In the end, participants will leave with ready-to-use strategies to help their students find their Inner Motivation.

    Session 6I: Budding Ethnographers: Examining Campus Culture (BA, RF, PG)
    Presenters: Carla Rogers; Lisa Gillis-Davis, First Year Experience Counselors/Introduction to College, Universery of Hawaii, Windward Community College
    Summary: Participate in active-learning exercises which demonstrate how two classes (Culture/Humanity and Introduction to College) partner in a learning community to teach students the culture of higher education. Learners will develop skills in ethnographic research including interviewing, observation and critical thinking as they become acclimated to the somewhat confusing college campus culture. Learners gain a deeper understanding about the less apparent cultural values prevalent in college that drive the more visible aspects of culture including language, behavioral norms and perspectives, thus strengthening their sense of belonging and college success. Details on implementing a similar class project will be provided.

    Session 6J: Framing Feedback Practices to Positively Impact Self-Regulated Learning for All Students- Part 1 (BA, SL) This session is Part One of a 2-Part session. See Session 7J.
    Presenter: Janeth W. Franklin, Faculty Developer/Adjunct Faculty, Glendale Community College, AZ
    Summary: Most educators know that feedback impacts learning; however, they are not always aware of the variable influences different types of feedback have on learning. Participants will learn about the entire constructive feedback process where instructors and students become feedback seekers and feedback givers. Constructive feedback practices will be shared and experienced that propel learning to the ultimate goal of equipping and empowering self-regulated learners within any course content. The importance of receiving feedback will be emphasized along with the language and actions to use in giving feedback that builds a culture of care and continuous improvement mindsets and values mistakes. Participants will learn to evaluate and discriminate between constructive and destructive feedback through interactive learning experiences. This learning experience is a model to begin to use in learning environments next week.

    Session 6K: Emotional Intelligence (EI) and College Success (RM, EQ)
    Presenter: Skip Downing, Author, On Course & Founder, On Course Workshop
    Summary: How many students will your college or university lose this year because they can’t manage their emotions? In this interactive session—a condensed version of the presenter’s full-day pre-conference workshop on Emotional Intelligence (EI)—we will focus on what EI is, why it is critical to student success and retention, and how to help students manage test anxiety.

Breakout Sessions #7 (75 minutes) 9:45-11:00AM Saturday

    Session 7A: An Innovative & Collaborative FYE Program (MS, RF, RW, PC)
    Presenters: Gretchen Ehlers, FYE Lead Instructor, Math Instructor; Christina Llerena, FYE Team, Counselor; Nicole Cuttler, FYE Team, English Instructor, West Valley College, CA
    Summary: Many students who attend college for the first time never achieve their academic goals. West Valley College’s First Year Experience (FYE) program strives to change this trend. Students in the FYE program take a Counseling Student Success class in addition to an FYE English and/or FYE Math class. The FYE program is a true collaboration between the student services and academic sides of the house. All FYE instructors, both counseling and academic, attend On Course workshops. For the last two years, all FYE instructors have attended the On Course National Conference. Because all FYE students and instructors use On Course, we all use the same success strategies and language with students, even though we’re teaching different subjects. The panel will present quantitative and qualitative data establishing demographics, persistence and retention rates, and student experiences in the FYE program. Educators who will want to attend session include:

    1) All who would like to see an example of a wrap-around program integrating On Course methodologies and principles into both academic and Counseling classes in a cohesive way.
    2) Anyone interested in starting or reinvigorating a First Year Experience program.
    3) Campus leaders who would like to see a thriving example of collaboration between academic and student services areas.

    Session 7B: Brain-Friendly Instruction: Enhancing Lifelong Learning (BA, AE, RW, DS)
    Presenter: Eileen Zamora, Faculty Emerita, English & Learning Skills, Southwestern College, CA
    Summary: Traditional methods of instruction can leave both students and instructors feeling that they have been swimming against the tide. Why? Current brain research has demonstrated that some traditional instructional methods are not in alignment with the way the brain learns best. Come and learn five principles for brain-friendly instruction and experience structures and strategies that will enable you to awaken and engage the brains in the classroom – both the students’ and yours!

    Panel Session 7C: Padlet Possibilities – Using Their Phones to Keep Their Attention in Class (RM, AE, TD)
    Presenters: Kathy Magee and Paul Phillips, Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
    Summary: Tired of fighting your students’ phones for their attention? Maybe it’s because the phone is more interesting than the lesson (or worse, than you). Why not use those phones to encourage participation in the day’s classroom activities and keep the students’ focus on the learning and lessons you have planned. This session will have participants using their Ipads, tablets, and phones to access Padlet in order to identify, discuss, and adapt ways that this free software can be used in multi-disciplines.

    Session 7D: Creating a Support System – The Assignment Swap (PG, PC)
    Presenter: Essie Childers, Faculty, Education & Reading, Blinn College, TX
    Summary: Many instructors would like to be creative, but lack the time to choose new activities to incorporate into their lessons. An activity might look good on paper, but you may wonder if it is really engaging. The solution? The Assignment Swap. In this workshop, you will help present the session. Bring one of your favorite classroom activities to share with the group. We will practice the empowering quality of employing interdependence that we teach to our students every semester. You will have an opportunity to explore favorite assignments from other participants and reflect on how you might use/adapt these assignments with your students. This session is great for educators in all disciplines. No assignment to share? No problem. You are welcome to attend. Caution: You may catch yourself having an “aha” moment and laughing out loud (LOL).

    Session 7E: Using PBL, and Active and Collaborative Techniques in Science Teaching (MS, PG, AE)
    Presenter: Stamatis Muratidis, Faculty, Chemistry, Palo Alto College, TX
    Summary: Participants interested in tips for successfully involving students by developing Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL) techniques will be engaged by use of a variety of topics, models and tools. Most of the workshop will take place in a collaborative group format and best practices for forming, molding and nurturing collaborative groups will be emphasized. Along the way the presenter will be promoting data-driven best practices, while identifying and mitigating some of the common pitfalls of implementing PBL and ACL activities.

    Session 7F: Relax, Reflect, Relate: 3 R’s of Contemplative Practice (BA, PG, EQ)
    Presenter: William H. Johnson, Jr., Student Success Coordinator/Personal Development Coach, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC
    Summary: Is life moving too fast? Are you busy beyond belief? Well, slow down! Would you attend a session that allows you to take the time to relax and be still, reflect on your life, and relate your thoughts and feelings to others? If you answered “yes” to at least one of these questions, then this workshop is for you. Research has shown that people applying some type of contemplative practice in their lives are likely to be more engaged, and are healthier and happier in life. Attendees in this session will participate in two forms of contemplative practice – meditation and reflective writing – that enhance personal growth. By the end of the session, you will learn strategies to quiet the mind, engage the spirit, and connect with others!

    Session 7G: Working Together: Encouraging Interdependence in the Classroom and Beyond (PG, AE)
    Presenter: Teresa Ward, Faculty, Language Education and Development, Butte College, CA
    Summary: In order for students to succeed in college and in life, they need to learn to work effectively with others. In this workshop, participants will explore several collaborative learning structures and activities that help students make connections with one another and with the material being covered. Participants will have the opportunity to experience and analyze these learner-centered activities, which are easily adaptable to promote interdependence in a variety of learning environments. Participants will return to their campuses with a selection of strategies that can be used by both faculty and staff.

    Session 7H: What’s Self Esteem Got to Do With It? (RF, EQ)
    Presenter: Robin Middleton, Faculty, Student Development, Jamestown Community College, NY
    Summary: For many educators, the issue of Self-Esteem seems an unlikely/unnecessary topic in a student success class, but research tells us that the two are deeply entwined. Low self-esteem is often expressed by poor attendance and participation, as well as procrastination and simply “giving up.” In this workshop we will explore factors related to self-esteem and experience strategies that address some of these factors to help students develop a realistic, healthy sense of self, allowing them to set achievable goals with the knowledge and confidence that they are competent enough to succeed. Participants will leave with at least three strategies for empowering students to believe in themselves.

    Session 7I: Self Awareness and Learner Effectiveness (BA, RF, SL)
    Presenter: Jonathan Brennan, Faculty, English, Mission College, CA
    Summary: Students often face challenges in achieving their goals because they are unaware of how they can get in their own way. They can lack mindfulness, focus, and awareness of their strengths, liabilities and habitual patterns. Research on metacognition and academic learning reinforces the importance of students’ developing their capacity to be reflective and aware learners, understanding their own learning process, as well as their patterns of learning obstacles. Research on mindfulness practices indicate that they change how the brain responds to stress, strengthen connections in the prefrontal cortex and reduce reactivity in the limbic system, ultimately improving learning outcomes. This session is designed for educators teaching any discipline, and will present research, resources, and awareness strategies to bring back to the classroom or a student success program.

    Session 7J: Framing Feedback Practices to Positively Impact Self-Regulated Learning for All Students- Part 2 (BA, SL) This session is Part Two of a 2-Part session. See Session 6J.
    Presenter: Janeth W Franklin, Faculty Developer/Adjunct Faculty, Glendale Community College, AZ
    Summary: Most educators know that feedback impacts learning; however, they are not always aware of the variable influences different types of feedback have on learning. Participants will learn about the entire constructive feedback process where instructors and students become feedback seekers and feedback givers. Constructive feedback practices will be shared and experienced that propel learning to the ultimate goal of equipping and empowering self-regulated learners within any course content. The importance of receiving feedback will be emphasized along with the language and actions to use in giving feedback that builds a culture of care and continuous improvement mindsets and values mistakes. Participants will learn to evaluate and discriminate between constructive and destructive feedback through interactive learning experiences. This learning experience is a model to begin to use in learning environments next week.

    Session 7K: Study Smarter, Not Just Harder! (BA, PG, SL)
    Presenter: Amy Munson, Director of Instructional Design, United States Air Force Academy
    Summary: The United States Air Force Academy Science of Teaching and Learning program is conducting a study on how students learn about their own learning. The research team hypothesizes that students learn more from peers than from “outsiders” such as faculty members and has set out to develop a peer training and messaging program alongside a faculty training and messaging program using the same three highly successful learning/self-management strategies. On Course structures and strategies were implemented for the training components as researchers shared the benefits of practice testing, spaced practice and successive relearning as defined in Dunlosky and Rawson’s meta-analysis of learning strategies. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to learn more about those three strategies while also learning about how to implement a student “train the trainer” program.

Session 8 (11:25am-12:30pm, Saturday)

Session 8: Closing Session with Dr. Skip Downing and Dr. Jonathan Brennan
Summary: In this closing session you’ll have a chance to learn more about how other educators have been using On Course strategies to transform their campus, hear from students who have been using On Course strategies, and reflect on your own learning. If you implement just one (let alone a handful) of these innovative efforts on your campus, you’ll contribute mightily to improving the outcomes and experiences of both your students and colleagues. All in all, this session will both inspire and provide you with proven approaches for creating a culture of academic success at your campus. Also, as is our tradition, this session will end with a raffle of some great prizes, including one $495 scholarship to the 2017 On Course National Conference and three $500 scholarships to a 2016 On Course I Workshop.

SKIP DOWNING, Author, On Course: Strategies for Success in College and in Life and founder of On Course Workshops. Dr. Downing has earned degrees from Princeton University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Santa Monica, and Carnegie Mellon University. He holds advanced degrees in both English and counseling psychology. He was Professor of English at Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) for 32 years. In addition to his role as an academic instructor, Dr. Downing created and coordinated BCCC’s Student Success and Learning Community Programs. These programs teach students how to apply proven strategies of success to achieve their full potential in college and in life. The College Success Program resulted in a significant increase in both student academic success and retention. Skip’s teaching, writing, and consulting are all guided by his belief that the greatest mission of any educational institution is empowering its students to live rich, personally fulfilling lives.

JONATHAN BRENNAN has facilitated student success workshops for faculty from colleges and universities across North America for the last two decades. Dr. Brennan is a researcher in best practices in student success, holds a BA and an MA in English, an MA in Counseling Psychology, a PhD in Ethnic Studies (UC Berkeley), an EdD in Educational Leadership and Change (Fielding Graduate University), and also consults as an Effectiveness and Leadership Coach. Since 2006, he has served as Chair of the On Course National Conference.
Dr. Brennan is a faculty member (and former department and division chair) of the English Department at Mission College in Santa Clara, California. He designed and coordinated an On Course Program at Mission College that significantly improved the retention and academic success rate of students in developmental English, Mathematics, Reading, and ESL. He has chaired the Student Success Committee as well as the Accreditation Committee, served as Vice President of the Academic Senate, and teaches composition, African American and Native American literature, and life skills classes. He has served as director of an academic mentoring program for basic skills students, developed the first year seminar Learning Communities project, and directed research grants for the state of California’s Fund for Student Success and Fund for Instructional Improvement programs.
He was voted Faculty of the Year at Mission College in 1999-2000, and was awarded a NISOD Teaching Excellence Award. In April, 2005, he was awarded the Stanback-Stroud Diversity award from the California State Academic Senate, and in 2008 was awarded the California State Hayward Award for Excellence in Education. His publications include two books on Mixed Race and Black Indian Literature from Stanford Press and University of Illinois Press, and a student success textbook for high school students, Choosing a Good Road.

2016 On Course National Conference STRANDS:

RM: Responsibility & Motivation: Pre-Conf 1, Pre-Conf 3, Pre-Conf 4, Pre-Conf 5, Pre-Conf 7, 2B, 2F, 2G, 2H, 2J, 3B, 3D, 3H, 3I, 4D, 4E, 5F, 5H, 5J, P1, P2, P4, 6B, 6H, 6K, 7C

BA: Brain-Based and Self Aware: Pre-Conf 1, Pre-Conf 2, Pre-Conf 3, 2F, 2G, 2J, 3C, 3D, 4C, 4E, 4F, 4K, 5D, 5E, 5H, 5I, 5J, 5K, P5, 6E, 6I, 6J, 7B, 7F, 7I, 7J, 7K

MS: Math & Science: 2A, 3J, 4B, 4C, 5A, 5C, P1, P2, 6B, 6C, 7A, 7E

RF: Retention and FYE: Pre-Conf 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2J, 3B, 3D, 3F, 3I, 4A, 5A, 5D, 5H, 5I, 5K, 6A, 6F, 6I, 7A, 7H, 7I

PG: Peers and Group Learning: Pre-Conf 1, 2D, 2K, 3F, 3G, 3K, 4H, 4I, 4J, 5A, 5B, 5C, 5G, 6C, 6G, 6I, 7D, 7E, 7F, 7G, 7K

AE: Active & Engaged Learning: Pre-Conf 1, 2A, 2E, 2G, 2H, 2I, 2K, 3A, 3E, 3F, 3K, 4D, 4G, 4I, 4J, 5B, 5F, 5G, P3, P5, 6B, 6C, 6G, 7B, 7C, 7E, 7G

RW: Reading, Writing & Communication: 2D, 2G, 3E, 3H, 4D, 4H, 5A, 5E, 5F, P4, 6D, 6G, 7A, 7B

TD: Technology, Distance Learning & Social Media: 2K, 2I, 3A, 3C, 3K, 4B, 5G, 6D, 7C

PC: Professional Development & Institutional/Organizational Change: 2A, 2J, 3F, 3G, 4G, 5B, 6F, 7A, 7D

EQ: Emotional Intelligence & Self-Efficacy: Pre-Conf 5, Pre-Conf 6, 2F, 3B, 4F, 4K, 5E, 5I, 6E, 6K, 7F, 7H

DS: Diversity Strategies: 4E, 4K, 5D, 6A, 6D, 7B

SL: Self Management & Lifelong Learning: Pre-Conf 3, 2B, 2E, 3C, 3D, 3I, 4C, P2, 6J, 7I, 7J, 7K

AL: Accelerated & Innovative Learning Models: 2C, 2K, 3K, 4A, 4B, 5A, P1, 6F

GA: Gamification of Learning: 2E, 3J, 4G, 4H, P3

P: Poster Sessions = P1, P2, P3, P4, P5